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National brain tumour research funding needs to increase to £30-35 million a year

In memory of Martino Sclavi

It is with a huge sense of loss we pass on the news that Martino Sclavi has died.

A man of many parts, he will be best remembered by our community for his book “The Finch in my Brain” – an unflinchingly honest account of his own brain tumour diagnosis and the consequent fallout for both his personal and professional life.

His partner, the artist Kerry Brewer, told us this morning: “He went with grace wrapped in the love of his mother, his sister, myself and many of you round the world, he looks magnificent.”

Of course, he does, he always did!

Once met never forgotten, he was a close friend of our Head of Stakeholder Relations, Hugh Adams, who said: “I had the huge pleasure of spending time with Martino whose infectious energy, imagination and charm left you feeling better about the world after any encounter. Whether talking about film-making or fatherhood, fashion or faith, Martino’s perspective was always captivating and unique. I knew the illness was taking its toll and the search for relief becoming more desperate but I find it very difficult to accept that I won’t be in a café with him again and hear his voluminous laugh fill the room. He was always Marvellous Martino.”

Martino died surrounded by Kerry, his sister Bianca and his mother Marianella. He leaves behind a son, Miro, who will enter teenage hood without his inspirational and wise father.

Martino will be buried in Rome on Monday.

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