Together we will find a cure Donate
Together we will find a cure Donate

In Our Hearts

Less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years

The diagnosis of a brain tumour is devastating for the patient, their family and friends. 

For these people life will never be the same again.

These very brave people will remain in our hearts for ever and it is because of them that we are fighting to find a cure so that no other family should have to suffer in the same way.

We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new.
We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too.
Anon

You are forever in our hearts.                                                         

Recently published stories

Diane Wright

Mum was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and fought bravely against this.  Two years later, she was given the all clear.  She continued to have annual screening and was always relieved with the positive results she continued to have.

Then suddenly in August 2011, without any other indications, Mum started to experience seizures.  She visited the GP on a number of occasions before finally being referred to Neurology.  In November 2011, Mum was diagnosed with epilepsy.

It wasn’t until January 2012 that Mum was diagnosed with a brain tumour – a secondary cancer from her previous breast cancer.   Just eight weeks later, Mum died in hospital, after having an operation to remove the tumour.  It was such a shock for everyone that knew her to see this hard-working lady torn apart and taken by this disease in only a few months and at a time in her life when she was about to slow down and enjoy her grandchildren growing up.

Sweet dreams Mum…

Brain tumours can be very aggressive – as you can see from my mother’s story.  Much more needs to be done to fund research into brain tumours, to find better treatments and ultimately a cure, as well as discover the causes of brain tumours.   My brother, Adam, and I have set up the Diane Wright Trust to help raise funds for research into brain tumours.  Mum touched the hearts of everyone she met and the trust will enable her to carry on doing this.


Matt Wright – October 2012

 
Diane Wright

All stories

Diane Wright

Mum was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and fought bravely against this.  Two years later, she was given the all clear.  She continued to have annual screening and was always relieved with the positive results she continued to have.

Then suddenly in August 2011, without any other indications, Mum started to experience seizures.  She visited the GP on a number of occasions before finally being referred to Neurology.  In November 2011, Mum was diagnosed with epilepsy.

It wasn’t until January 2012 that Mum was diagnosed with a brain tumour – a secondary cancer from her previous breast cancer.   Just eight weeks later, Mum died in hospital, after having an operation to remove the tumour.  It was such a shock for everyone that knew her to see this hard-working lady torn apart and taken by this disease in only a few months and at a time in her life when she was about to slow down and enjoy her grandchildren growing up.

Sweet dreams Mum…

Brain tumours can be very aggressive – as you can see from my mother’s story.  Much more needs to be done to fund research into brain tumours, to find better treatments and ultimately a cure, as well as discover the causes of brain tumours.   My brother, Adam, and I have set up the Diane Wright Trust to help raise funds for research into brain tumours.  Mum touched the hearts of everyone she met and the trust will enable her to carry on doing this.


Matt Wright – October 2012

 
Diane Wright

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