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In Our Hearts

Less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years

These very brave people will remain in our hearts for ever and it is because of them that we are fighting to find a cure so that no other family should have to suffer in the same way.

We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new.


We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too.


Anon

You are forever in our hearts.

Recently published stories

Sean Crossey

Sean was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour in August 2016, aged 27. He remained positive throughout three brain surgeries, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, marrying his beloved Laura in June 2018.  Tragically, there was nothing which could save him and he passed away in September 2018, aged just 29.

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Kieran O’Sullivan

Wing Commander Kieran O’Sullivan personified his Royal Air Force service motto – Per Ardua ad Astra – Through adversity to the stars. He was a much-loved husband, son, friend and colleague, known to many as TGP, “The Ginger Prince”. Among his coworkers he was renowned for his exceptional talent, professionalism, ambition and good humour; he had a voracious appetite for work and an unwavering sense of determination combined with a boundless optimism. Cited as having the potential to rise to Air Commodore, Kieran tragically had to give up the career he loved in September 2018. This account was written by Kieran over a number of months. He passed away in November 2018, at the age of 44, almost 17 years after being diagnosed with a brain tumour and just two months after leaving the RAF. 
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Tony Brassington

Popular engineer Tony Brassington, who lived in Lower Tean, Staffordshire, died just 10 months after his diagnosis with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), aged 65. A doting grandad, he left his wife Wendy, their five children and seven grandchildren. Desperate to raise awareness of the disease, his family are organising a fundraising walk in his memory.

Here is Tony’s story, as told by his daughter, Leanne…

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All stories

Gaye Chaffe

A former officer in the Metropolitan Police, Gaye Chaffe was diagnosed with an oligodendroglioma brain tumour in 1992. Her husband Simon supported her through two craniotomy procedures and subsequent treatment. The tumour spread to her brain stem and she passed away six years later in her husband’s arms, leaving two sons aged eight and three. Read more

Gemma Edgar

We are grateful to Gemma who worked with us in May 2015 to share her story here. Sadly, she passed away on 19th December 2018. We remember Gemma as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. She will be forever in our hearts.

Gemma, 29, a paediatric nurse at Colchester General Hospital, and a wife and mother, was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour after just a few days of migraine-type symptoms. Her sons, Noah and Dylan were just eight weeks and two years old at the time. 
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George Michael Harrison

George was diagnosed with a brain tumour at the age of 25. He underwent surgery and married his childhood sweetheart Georgina 13 months later. Sadly his tumour returned five years later. He had radiotherapy and chemotherapy which left him partially paralysed with double vision and memory problems along with other side effects. Together with Georgina, George’s mum Sondra cared for him during his last months. He passed away with them and his sisters by his side in June 2010. Read more

Georgie Beadman

Georgie Beadman wife, mother, daughter, and sister, died seven years after being diagnosed with a low- grade glioma. She was a talented potter who loved music and the arts. In February 2015, Georgie died at the age of 41 leaving a husband and two small children.
                                   
“It is desperately sad to think that brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer and I was shocked to learn this area receives just 1% of the national spend on cancer research. A number of the girls who Georgie met during her year as a debutante are now involved in fundraising to support vital research into brain tumours which is wonderful. We were unable to help Georgie but I am sure that we can help others.”

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Gillian Fenton

A loving wife, mother and grandmother, Gillian built her life around creating a happy home for her family. She lived in the Trossachs and enjoyed the natural beauty of Scotland where her husband worked as a deerstalker with the Forestry Commission. At first misdiagnosed with multiple sclerosis, her anxious family were finally told she had a tumour of the central nervous system and she passed away six months later at the home she was dedicated to making.
 

“I miss my mum every day. I miss being able to talk to her, I went to her about everything and find myself reflecting on what she would have said about things. Sometimes I have very vivid dreams where we have conversations and I wake up feeling as if we really have spoken. It is only now I am able to talk about my mum openly and remember her without the fog of bereavement. I know only too well how little is known about the effects of cancer on the brain. Research is the only way we are going to make a difference and prevent other families suffering as we have done.”
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Glendon Snape

We are grateful to Glendon who worked with us in May 2017 to share his story here. Sadly, he passed away on 12th October 2017. We remember Glendon as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. He will be forever in our hearts.

Glendon Snape was looking forward to starting his honeymoon when he was struck with a terrible headache during the journey. Never setting foot in the hotel, Glendon, 51 from Preston, was instead rushed into hospital by ambulance from the hotel car park. The newly-weds, with four children between them, were devastated to hear that Glendon had a grade four glioblastoma multiforme, with possibly just months to live.


“When the doctors told me I had 14 months to live, my heart just sank and knowing more became an obsession; I just had to try to find a way out of the nightmare... It’s like an addiction but it’s kept me alive.” 

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Glenn McMahon

Husband, son, father and step-father, Glenn McMahon was diagnosed with an aggressive glioblastoma multiforme stage 4 (GBM) brain tumour after experiencing co-ordination problems on the golf course. He married Wendy in February 2014 and, knowing their time together would be cut short, the couple set about making the most of their lives through travel, socialising and their mutual love of fine food. Glenn died in June 2015 at the age of 53.

“To be told it was a brain tumour was like being hit by a bus. Glenn asked straight away how long he had and was told the short prognosis. We were devastated. We had begun to suspect Glenn might have motor neurone disease and never dreamt it would be a brain tumour. We had both been married before and having found each other now faced our future which was going to be cut short.”

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Godfrey Butchers

Husband, step-father and grandfather, Godfrey was laid to rest on what would have been his 25th wedding anniversary. His widow Shirley chose music from their marriage ceremony for the funeral which took place near their home on the Isle of Wight. Godfrey was 71 when he passed away just ten weeks after being diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour. 

“A proud man, Godfrey didn’t want lots of visitors or people fussing around him. He was thinking of others and wanted to spare them the pain of seeing what was happening to him. Close family came and it was a joy to see the love in his eyes as our granddaughter, who was just a few months old, sat on the bed with him.”
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Graham Addison

Graham Addison was a larger-than-life character at the heart of a tight-knit family. His brain tumour diagnosis in 2015 was a terrible blow to his wife, five children and nine grandchildren, but the family remained positive as Graham responded well to surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, after a second operation Graham deteriorated rapidly and the love and support of his family couldn’t halt the aggressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). He passed way in September 2016, aged 66.

“Dad came out of theatre a different man and, for the first time, he was noticeably in decline. He couldn’t remember his own date of birth or even what day of the week it was. He was so brave but I remember once seeing the fear in his eyes when it dawned on him that his brain was failing him. How scary it must have been for him – to go from such a bright and intelligent man to someone who could no long remember how to use his mobile phone.”

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Guy Farthing

Garden designer Guy Farthing had just turned 60 when he was diagnosed with a low-grade brain tumour after suffering stroke-like symptoms. With surgery not an option, Guy underwent radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Sadly, over time the tumour became more aggressive and after nearly 10 years of battling the disease, Guy died in October 2017, leaving wife Jenny, children Kathy and Mark, and granddaughter Immie.


“It wasn’t until a few months later that we received a letter through from Southampton hospital asking him to attend for a pre-assessment. On arrival, we were given a letter which knocked us for six, as it stated that, two days later, Guy would be admitted for a biopsy on his brain tumour. We arranged to speak to the surgeon for clarification as we felt they must have got it wrong or maybe the letter was supposed to be for someone else.”
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