Together we will find a cure Donate
Together we will find a cure Donate

In Our Hearts

Less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years

These very brave people will remain in our hearts for ever and it is because of them that we are fighting to find a cure so that no other family should have to suffer in the same way.

"We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new.

We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too."

Anon

 

You are forever in our hearts.

Recently published stories

Rachael Corbishley

Rachael Corbishley was diagnosed with a brain tumour in May 2021 after having a seizure at her home in Finsbury Park, North London. She had been suffering with an earache for about two weeks. The 29-year-old underwent a cranial biopsy, which confirmed she had brain cancer, and one radiotherapy session before becoming too ill to continue the treatment. Her tumour is documented as a grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma but it is now thought she could have had a grade 4 glioblastoma (GBM). She died in the October, five months after receiving her initial diagnosis. 

Read more

Ethan Treharne

Sports enthusiast, Ethan from Sandhurst in Berkshire was diagnosed with a glioblastoma (GBM) as he prepared for his GCSEs, aged 15. Severe headaches and slurred speech led to an MRI scan which revealed the shocking discovery of a mass on his brain. Over the course of two years, he had three operations and developed epilepsy as a result of treatment for the tumour. Desperate to save their son, parents, Nikki and Justin found treatment trials taking them to Germany and London. However, the tumour was too aggressive and Ethan died at home on 26 November 2021.

Read more

Oliver Vivian-Price

Baby Oliver from Blackwood in South Wales was just 11 months old when he died from an extremely rare brain tumour. Despite undergoing brain surgery at 15 weeks old and seven months of gruelling chemotherapy, the tumour was too aggressive. He died on 22 July 2020, at home with his parents and older brother Harley by his side.

Since then his mum, Zara, has been working with Brain Tumour Research to raise awareness and funds to help find a cure for the disease, in the hope no other family will suffer the same devastation and loss.

Read more

All stories

Daniel Franklin

Daniel Franklin, a kitchen assistant from Worthing, West Sussex, was diagnosed with a glioblastoma (GBM) in October 2020 after suffering with balance problems and sickness. The location of the tumour on his brain stem rendered it inoperable but he did have radiotherapy. He went on to have chemotherapy, which proved ineffective, and a second round of radiotherapy, which he complemented with holistic treatments. Sadly, from August 2021, his health began to deteriorate and he died at home three months later at the age of 26.

Read more

Daniel Payne

Daniel Payne, of Brackley, Northamptonshire, had already been treated for testicular cancer when, in 2006, at the age of 22, he was diagnosed with an incurable grade 2 astrocytoma. During his 13-year-long battle with the disease, he not only faced testicular cancer a second time but underwent four brain surgeries, developing an abscess and a serious infection as a result. The last three months of his life were the most difficult as his tumour progressed to a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and he lost control of his body, ultimately deciding he did not want to continue with treatment. He died at home by his loving wife’s side on 23 December 2019.

Read more

Danny Green

The Danny Green Fund was set up when his parents lost their gorgeous son Danny at the age of 11. Before he was diagnosed with a brain tumour, their beautiful, fun loving and energetic son was a typical 10-year-old in every way, very much living for the moment and enjoying life. Tragically, Danny died just nine months after diagnosis, leaving a void which will never be filled.

“Our hearts are broken and can never be repaired. To lose a child is unbearable and should not happen. Danny is the inspiration for our charity: to raise funds to help children with Posterior Fossa Syndrome, which was Danny’s main battle on a daily basis, to fund research to help find a cure, as well as to raise awareness of this devastating disease to hopefully prevent other children from suffering as Danny did...”

Read more

Danny Griffiths

Danny Griffiths, from Bingham in Nottinghamshire, was 57 when he died from a brain tumour he bravely fought for two-and-a-half years. Danny was happily married to Andrea and a proud father to Olivia, 22. Danny’s tumour was inoperable but he underwent palliative chemotherapy to try to prolong his life. He spent his final weeks being cared for at home by Andrea and Olivia and tragically died in December 2020, having contracted COVID-19 just days before. Olivia, who has just qualified as a nurse, is now keen to raise awareness of the disease, which killed her dad and tore her family apart. 

Read more

Danny Horton

My brother, Danny, was a healthy, sporty, fun-loving young man but in 2010 he passed away, aged 36, with an astrocytoma brain tumour.  Just six months later in the same year, my wife, Maddie, lost her father to the same cruel disease.

“Danny passed away nine years after his diagnosis, aged 36
 – yet another tragic example of the stark fact that more children and adults under the age of 40 die of a brain tumour than from any other cancer.  He walked his brain tumour path on his own, living with a gun to his head.  
It makes me think all the more of him.”

 
Read more

Darel Bryan

Darel was 33 years old and in the prime of his life when he was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in December 2014. Previously extremely healthy and active, it was a complete shock and devastating to his family and his beloved partner of 12 years, Natalie. Darel bravely fought this aggressive disease for 15 months, but sadly lost his battle on 26th February 2016.

“The clinical nurse specialists at the meeting told us not to look his diagnosis up… I was to discover that GBM is a monster; it is relentless and an utterly cruel disease. It not only robs you of who you are, it robbed Darel and me of our future together.”
Read more

Daryl Owens

Daryl Owens was diagnosed with a grade 3 astrocytoma when he was 34 years old. He always stayed positive, approaching everything with a sense of humour, and his condition at one point stabilised. After two years however, Daryl began to deteriorate and in October 2018, three years since his diagnosis, he passed away with his wife Jude and his parents by his side.

Read more

Dave Holden

We are grateful to Dave who worked with us in September 2015 to share his story here. Sadly, he passed away in February 2019. We remember Dave as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. He will be forever in our hearts.

Father-of-three Dave Holden is living with a grade 3 astrocytoma brain tumour. It was diagnosed in 2010 after he began to experience difficulty driving. The tumour responded well to 18 months of chemotherapy and radiation but a scan in March 2015 revealed it had returned. Dave continues to work full-time and remains positive about the future.

“I can’t be bothered with the doom and gloom. I have always been quite a positive person and now it is more important than ever. I do have days where I can feel down, but my wife gives me a kick to help me get over it. We have the kids to think about and I need to be here and on good form for as long as I can in order to look after my family.”

Read more

Dave Hopkins

We are grateful to Dave and his wife Nicki who worked with us in September 2021 to share his story here. Sadly, he passed away in November 2021. We remember Dave as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. He will be forever in our hearts.

On 1 September 2020, the lives of Dave Hopkins and his family changed forever, when the father-of-three from Scunthorpe in Lincolnshire was diagnosed with a brain tumour. Dave had a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common type of primary high-grade brain tumour in adults, carrying with it a very stark prognosis. On finding out about his devastating prognosis, Dave’s family and friends rallied round to raise as much money as possible to try to extend his life. They also galvanised the support of their MP. His wife Nicki is passionate about campaigning for more funding for research into brain tumours. 

Read more

Dave O'Donoghue

Husband, father, and grandfather, Dave O'Donoghue, was 59 when he was diagnosed with a grade four glioblastoma multiforme brain tumour, after suffering from severe headaches. Though he underwent surgery and radiotherapy, Dave sadly passed away less than four months after diagnosis, missing his milestone 60th birthday by a matter of weeks. This year marks 10 years since his passing.

“After what seemed like hours waiting in silence for the consultant to arrive, he came in and did not delay giving the diagnosis. Dad had a grade four glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a very aggressive tumour and it was going to end his life within the next three months. We all sat there in shock at the news we had just heard, trying to piece it all together. My mum fled the room in tears while I just sat there in silence with my dad. His only question was if he would make his 60th birthday on the 13th July. The consultant paused, shook his head and said ‘I’m so sorry’.”

Read more