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In Our Hearts

Less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years

These very brave people will remain in our hearts for ever and it is because of them that we are fighting to find a cure so that no other family should have to suffer in the same way.

We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new.


We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too.


Anon

You are forever in our hearts.

Recently published stories

Martin Evans

Originally from Lordswood in Southampton, 69-year-old Martin Evans moved to Romsey in 2017 to be closer to his brother, Gary. Before the move, Martin had been living on his own in the home he shared with his mother, until she died in 2014. In 2019, the talented musician, who lived with autism, discovered he had a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after his “unusual behaviour” saw him admitted to hospital and a scan showed a lesion on his brain. Despite an operation to remove the tumour and radiotherapy treatment, the cancer was too aggressive and nine months after he was diagnosed, Martin died on 23 June 2020. Now, his brother and bandmates are working with Brain Tumour Research to raise awareness and fundraise to help find a cure for the deadly disease.

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Surinder Shergill

Mum-of-three and grandmother-of-seven Surinder Shergill, of Erith in South East London, was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in July 2018. Her symptoms were attributed to grief following the death of her much-loved brother months earlier but included vacant spells and weakness in her legs. By the time her tumour was discovered, she was given a prognosis of just eight weeks. She died at home, surrounded by family, in September 2018, one night after celebrating her 71st birthday.

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Callum Elliott

Oxfordshire toddler, Callum Elliott was just 20 months when he was diagnosed with an anaplastic ependymoma after a family member noticed a constant tilt of his head. After initially being given medication for wry neck, concerned mum, Zoe Elliott, re-visited the doctors and was referred to the John Radcliffe Hospital where further tests revealed the devastating news of a tumour on Callum’s brain. He had three operations, encountering complications during his diagnosis including a tracheostomy, and recovering from meningitis, staphylococcus aureus and sepsis. After undergoing only five out of 35 rounds of gruelling chemotherapy, and radiotherapy treatment, Callum’s tumour became too aggressive and he died on 9 January 2017, aged four, in a hospice with Zoe by his side

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All stories

Blaise Nelson

Blaise Nelson was diagnosed with multiple brain tumours in February 2018, at the age of just six. The schoolboy from Didsbury in Greater Manchester underwent major surgery and extensive treatment, including a clinical trial, to try to prolong his life. Tragically, his treatment options eventually ran out and he died at home in October 2019, leaving behind his devastated parents Rachel and Chris and three siblings, including his four-year-old sister, Asha. 

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Bob Picken

Bob shared his story with us in September 2016. Sadly, he passed away on 25th June 2019. We will remember Bob as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. He will be forever in our hearts.

A successful double bass player, Bob Picken has been a member of Liverpool band Ella Guru, as well as a backing for artists such as Neville Skelly, She Drew The Gun, Bill Ryder-Jones and Marvin Powell.

Diagnosed in 2012 with an anaplastic astrocytoma, whom he affectionately calls “Bieber” in reference to the Canadian singer Justin, Bob has managed to overcome a number of setbacks to carry on with his career, and in his own words “stick two fingers up to cancer”.

“You go through five stages of cancer: denial, anger, bargaining, sadness and eventually acceptance.”

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Bob Witherspoon

Diagnosed with a multifocal grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in December 2018, 71-year-old Bob Witherspoon from Whitley Bay lost his life to this aggressive brain tumour just four months later. At his funeral, rather than flowers, his family requested a collection for Brain Tumour Research. Having raised over £700 to help fund research to prevent other families from going through the pain they have suffered, they now want to raise awareness of this cruel disease, by sharing their heart-breaking experience. 

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Brian Cross


Brian lived in Gressenhall near Dereham, Norfolk and was a great family man and a wonderful husband.  He had three children – Camilla from his first marriage and Rosie and Tom from our marriage.  He cared deeply about each one of them and was particularly protective about Camilla who suffered badly with asthma and eczema from an early age.  Brian was diagnosed with a rare lymphoma brain tumour and passed away almost a year later, aged 62, on 23rd September 2006.

Here is Brian’s story as told by his wife, Sally…

“Brian knew he was going to die.  There were still lots of things he wanted to do, but he was at peace with himself, which was a huge comfort to me.  We used to sit together in the garden and he would tell me everything he wanted me to do with the children and his businesses after he had gone.  He was an amazing man, even in the last year when he was dying.”

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Brian Rockell

Brain's story was written while he was still with us. Sadly Brian passed away at the end of November 2018. We will update his story fully at a more suitable time. Our deepest condolences go out to his wife Fay and their family at this immeasurably sad time.

Brian Rockell has worked within the healthcare industry for decades, yet when he was diagnosed with a glioblastoma, aged 68, he was shocked by the distressing experience of brain tumour patients. Although facing his own anxieties and challenges, Brian is now determined to campaign for and support others affected by this devastating disease.

“I was transferred to the Royal Sussex County Hospital for surgery…. and it went relatively well. Looking back, the surgery was the easy part. I had no idea then how much support I would need as a patient and how different my life was about to become...”

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Briar Butler

Briar Butler from Kendal in Cumbria, was just 30 when, in June 2018, she received the devastating news that she had an incurable brain tumour. Her diagnosis came after years of suffering from debilitating mental health problems. Briar, a trainee accountant and keen pole dancer, underwent surgery to debulk the tumour and several more operations after she developed infections in her skull. The mum-of-one spent the final few months of her life in a care home, which meant she was unable to see her loved ones when restrictions were imposed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Briar died on 17 August 2021, leaving her four sisters, her mum Beverley and her six-year-old Noah devastated.   

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Callum Elliott

Oxfordshire toddler, Callum Elliott was just 20 months when he was diagnosed with an anaplastic ependymoma after a family member noticed a constant tilt of his head. After initially being given medication for wry neck, concerned mum, Zoe Elliott, re-visited the doctors and was referred to the John Radcliffe Hospital where further tests revealed the devastating news of a tumour on Callum’s brain. He had three operations, encountering complications during his diagnosis including a tracheostomy, and recovering from meningitis, staphylococcus aureus and sepsis. After undergoing only five out of 35 rounds of gruelling chemotherapy, and radiotherapy treatment, Callum’s tumour became too aggressive and he died on 9 January 2017, aged four, in a hospice with Zoe by his side

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Carl Piddington

Carl and his family have been staunch supporters of Brain Tumour Research for many years. Sadly, Carl passed away on 26 March 2019 and we remain enormously grateful for all he helped us to achieve and will continue our fight in his memory.

Manchester pub landlord, Carl Piddington, was fit and healthy with three children, when he discovered one day that he could no longer control his hand. After a massive seizure and subsequent tests, Carl was told that his aggressive brain tumour could end his life within a year. Determined to be a long-term survivor, Carl is now eight years on after diagnosis and facing yet more treatments.

 “I know this is terminal. Maybe it will get me, maybe it will be something else, but I’m not going to sit and wait for it. As my dad always used to say, while laying his hands on my shoulders and looking into my eyes: “you are a lion, my son!”

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Carol Cooper

Psychiatric nurse Carol, from Fareham, died just six weeks after her diagnosis with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) – a highly aggressive type of tumour – in August 2000. She was 53 and left her two sons Mark and Simon. Now Mark, who studies at Bournemouth University, is determined to help fund the fight into the disease, by taking part in the Brain Tumour Research charity’s Wear A Hat Day with his fellow students.

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Caroline Cronin

Marine biologist Caroline Cronin’s biggest wish after being diagnosed with a terminal brain tumour was to get back to work. There were two things she felt she still wanted to achieve – to get married and have a baby. She defied expectations to achieve both and the family were able to spend precious months at home together before Caroline passed away in October 2013 at the age of 32, leaving her husband Marcus and their six-month-old daughter Florence.
  
“The few times that Caroline allowed anyone to see her upset about her condition was when she worried about how her illness affected others. We both desperately wanted to be married and felt blessed to have a baby together. The grieving process takes a long time but knowing Caroline was able to do the two things she most wanted makes it a bit easier. We had been through so many very difficult times together and, when Caroline died, I was just grateful that it was as she had wished. I held her hand as she passed away at home. The first thing I did was to hold Florence and, in a way, it meant I didn’t feel as if I had lost Caroline completely as I had our baby.”
 
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