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In Our Hearts

Less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years

These very brave people will remain in our hearts for ever and it is because of them that we are fighting to find a cure so that no other family should have to suffer in the same way.

We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new.


We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too.


Anon

You are forever in our hearts.

Recently published stories

Michelle Noakes

In August 2019, mum-of-two Michelle Noakes, from Bow in East London, had her ultimate dream wedding to her beloved husband, Simon. They were surrounded by their friends and family, with their young children Otto and Poppy there to take part in their special day. Only a few months later, however, their world would come crashing down when Michelle was diagnosed with an aggressive and inoperable brain tumour. Determined to defy her stark prognosis, Michelle underwent standard of care NHS treatment, as well as private therapies, but sadly her condition worsened and eventually, her options ran out. She died at home in June 2021, aged 39, leaving her loved ones devastated. Her family feel strongly that there needs to be more funding for research to find better treatments so that other young children do not lose their mum in this way.

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Chloe Clayton

Chloe from Worcestershire died exactly a year after she was diagnosed with a rare grade 4 brain tumour. She began to experience painful headaches and after trips back and forth to the GP, she was finally referred for an MRI scan which revealed devastating news of a mass on her brain. Months of radiotherapy couldn’t compete with the aggressiveness of the tumour and the cancer spread and Chloe died on 15 September 2016 at the age of 19, surrounded by her family. Six years after her death, her brother, Jordan is fundraising to help fund the fight and find a cure for the deadly disease.

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Michael Crayford

Michael Crayford, of Gillingham in Kent, was diagnosed with a rare immature teratoma, a type of intracranial germ cell tumour (GCT), in September 2016 after suffering with sudden headaches, blurred vision, sickness and balance problems. He underwent five brain surgeries, intensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy but died six months later, in March 2017. He was just 13 years old.

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All stories

Angus Anthony

In 2008, Angus was working as a police officer at Scotland Yard.  He walked into a post at the railway station and afterwards had a severe headache which progressively got worse.  We suspected a haematoma and were referred for a scan at our local hospital.  In fact, the news was much worse – it revealed that Angus had a brain tumour.  Angus was only 41, a husband and father of two young children.

Since the initial diagnosis, we also had to come to terms with the fact that Angus had a very rare and very aggressive cerebral lymphoma brain tumour.  There are only about seven cases across the UK and 30-35 in the whole of Europe.  Almost nothing is known about cerebral lymphomas because they are so rare - so there has been no research into how to treat them.  Angus was offered drugs which had not been previously tested.

 
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Anna Olivia Hughes

Anna was diagnosed with a brain tumour in February 2005 and following a 7-hour operation to remove it she underwent an intensive chemotherapy programme at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge. For 15 months she spent every other week in hospital but sadly, like the majority of children diagnosed with brain tumours, Anna lost her battle and passed away aged 3 years 8 months.


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Anna Swabey


Diagnosed with a brain tumour at the age of 23, Anna Swabey was intitally given just months to live. Under the care of neurosurgeon Kevin O’Neill, who leads the Brain Tumour Research Centre of Excellence at Imperial College, London, Anna had surgery and treatment. She also got engaged and shared her experiences through her blog Inside My Head. Anna passed away on 16th September 2016, the day before she was due to marry.


“I am fortunate in that I don’t feel my illness dictates my life and while I am most definitely the same person, I even feel as if I am a better person for it. I know this may sound odd but my diagnosis has made me view my life differently and the way I am choosing to live now leaves me feeling fulfilled. I love knowing that I can make a difference, and, potentially help others.”
 
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Annie Hughes

Annie had severe speech and language difficulties which meant that she had to attend special schools from the age of six.  Despite her problems, Annie was a ray of sunshine and made friends wherever she went.  On leaving school she found herself a job, met her future husband and started a family.  After all the early adversities, it seemed that Annie’s life was to have a fairy tale ending…

“As a family, we are all united in a desire for Annie’s legacy to be that fair amounts of funding are dedicated to research into brain tumours.  We want there to be hope, not despair, for other people who learn that a member of their family has been diagnosed with this devastating disease.”
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Anthony Bowes

Fitness fanatic Anthony Bowes, from Bolton, was just 28 when he lost his brave battle with an incurable brain tumour.

His diagnosis came in 2016, after suffering a number of seizures. In the months that followed, he underwent two brain surgeries, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, fighting the terrible disease with strength and determination until the end.

For Anthony’s family, the distress of losing their loved one was worsened by what they felt was a lack of appropriate care immediately prior to his death. They have since received an apology from the NHS and an assurance that changes will be made to prevent the same mistakes being repeated.

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Aria Nikjooy

We are grateful to Aria who worked with us in October 2020 to share his story here. Sadly, he passed away on 8th February 2021. We remember Aria as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. He will be forever in our hearts.

In November 2018, paediatric trainee doctor Aria Nikjooy was diagnosed with a rare brain tumour, sitting in his cerebellum. Aged just 27, he was operated on, treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy and thankfully the tumour was kept at bay. Then, in March 2020, the same brain tumour came back and he had a second brain surgery. Devastatingly, a second recurrence came in July 2020 resulting in another brain operation and more cancer treatment. As part of his recovery and rehabilitation, Aria turned to writing. This culminated in him writing a children’s fiction book to help to explain the complex issues surrounding illness and cancer to his little boy.

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Arthur Boyd

Arthur was a fit and healthy man and a loving husband and father to his three sons.  He had a strong Christian faith which was a huge source of comfort and strength not only to him, but his whole family when he was diagnosed with a brain tumour just before Christmas 2015.  He died just short of six months later, aged 69.

“I was aware of brain tumours, but had never equated them to brain cancer until Dad was diagnosed.  I spent an inordinate amount of time researching treatments such as electric therapy in Germany, as well as immunotherapy trials, but it was soul-destroying not to be able to find anything available to Dad no matter how hard or far we looked.”
 
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Ashley Shameli

Ashley Shameli was 22 and training to be a solicitor when he was diagnosed with a grade two astrocytoma brain tumour after suffering a massive epileptic seizure. He underwent several operations with the pioneering brain surgeon Henry Marsh and endured gruelling chemotherapy and radiotherapy. He lived for another eight years and died aged 30, leaving his beloved mum Jeanette, his dad, his older sister Shardi and younger brother Shervin.

“When Ashley was born I was six-and-a-half. I remember being so proud to be the big sister of such a beautiful, happy little boy. My other brother, Shervin, was born a year and half later. The three of us were exceptionally close as children and lived together when we moved to London. I will never forget Ashley’s beautiful smile, his cheeky dimple, his twinkling eyes and his kindness. He adored his family and we adored him.”
 
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Asmat Chaudry

Father-of-three Asmat Chaudry was diagnosed with a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in April 2013 after suffering a seizure at home and losing feeling in his left side. He had been experiencing some forgetfulness in the weeks prior but was otherwise a fit and active 74-year-old. He underwent brain surgery and radiotherapy but died 15 months later, during the most sacred days of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

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Atif Hanif

Atif was a loving father and husband and at the pinnacle of his career at a prestigious London law firm when he was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour, dying two years later. Now his wife finds comfort in the fact that Atif has left his legacy in both of their daughters.

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