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In Our Hearts

Less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years

These very brave people will remain in our hearts for ever and it is because of them that we are fighting to find a cure so that no other family should have to suffer in the same way.

We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new.


We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too.


Anon

You are forever in our hearts.

Recently published stories

Martin Evans

Originally from Lordswood in Southampton, 69-year-old Martin Evans moved to Romsey in 2017 to be closer to his brother, Gary. Before the move, Martin had been living on his own in the home he shared with his mother, until she died in 2014. In 2019, the talented musician, who lived with autism, discovered he had a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after his “unusual behaviour” saw him admitted to hospital and a scan showed a lesion on his brain. Despite an operation to remove the tumour and radiotherapy treatment, the cancer was too aggressive and nine months after he was diagnosed, Martin died on 23 June 2020. Now, his brother and bandmates are working with Brain Tumour Research to raise awareness and fundraise to help find a cure for the deadly disease.

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Surinder Shergill

Mum-of-three and grandmother-of-seven Surinder Shergill, of Erith in South East London, was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in July 2018. Her symptoms were attributed to grief following the death of her much-loved brother months earlier but included vacant spells and weakness in her legs. By the time her tumour was discovered, she was given a prognosis of just eight weeks. She died at home, surrounded by family, in September 2018, one night after celebrating her 71st birthday.

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Callum Elliott

Oxfordshire toddler, Callum Elliott was just 20 months when he was diagnosed with an anaplastic ependymoma after a family member noticed a constant tilt of his head. After initially being given medication for wry neck, concerned mum, Zoe Elliott, re-visited the doctors and was referred to the John Radcliffe Hospital where further tests revealed the devastating news of a tumour on Callum’s brain. He had three operations, encountering complications during his diagnosis including a tracheostomy, and recovering from meningitis, staphylococcus aureus and sepsis. After undergoing only five out of 35 rounds of gruelling chemotherapy, and radiotherapy treatment, Callum’s tumour became too aggressive and he died on 9 January 2017, aged four, in a hospice with Zoe by his side

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All stories

Amita Charavda

Along with her husband Mahendra, Amita had owned a shop called “Lucky Jewellers” on Belgrave Road – Leicester’s Golden Mile for nearly 40 years.  She was looking forward to enjoying retirement and having more leisure time to spend with family and enjoy lovely holidays.  Tragically, she passed away from a brain tumour, aged 55, just three months after diagnosis.

Here is Amita’s story as told by her daughter, Sneha…

“The speed in which we lost Mum was so shocking.  I couldn’t believe that in this day and age Mum could have something which was incurable.”
 
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Amy Quin

We are grateful to Amy who worked with us in May 2017 to share their story here. Sadly, she passed away in 2019. We remember Amy as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. She will be forever in our hearts.

Determined mum Amy Quin will mark the first anniversary of her brain tumour diagnosis by skydiving 15,000ft from a plane with her sisters. The trio are raising money for the charity Brain Tumour Research. With a prognosis of five to seven years, Amy is hopeful that research will help to identify new treatments which would mean her tumour is operable giving her precious time with her family including partner Lewis and their four-year-old son Hector.


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Andrea Thursfield

Andrea passed away just nine months after being diagnosed with a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour. She was 46. The mother of a teenager and much-loved partner of Nick Butler, she underwent surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy but could not be saved. She and Nick had a short-lived romance as teenagers and then met again by chance 21 years later.

Nick tells Andrea’s story …

I first met Andrea when I was 19. We went out a couple of times but then I went away to work and we lost touch. More than two decades had gone by and we had both had our 40th birthdays by the time we met again by chance in July 2005. We bumped into each other in a pub. I had always hoped that somehow, somewhere, I would see her again but had no idea what she was doing or where she was. It turns out that, unknowingly, we lived very close to each other in Perton, Wolverhampton. She tottered over on her heels and we chatted, it ended up with her inviting me round for a cup of tea and she said: “Don’t cock it up this time!” It seems we both held a candle for each other after all that time. She had a young son, Ryan, from a previous relationship but neither of us had married. Things moved on and we each sold our houses in order to buy a property together to make a home for us and Ryan.
 
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Andrew Atkinson-Whitton

Andrew Atkinson-Whitton loved life. In his 37 years, he touched so many lives with his infectious smile and happy-go lucky nature. Andrew kept smiling even when he was diagnosed with a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and had to undergo intensive surgery and treatment but the tumour was too aggressive. He died 20 July 2018, just 14 months after diagnosis, leaving his husband Carl, mum Jill and brother Robert.

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Andrew Bath

Aged 36, Andrew was enjoying life and in a job he loved. Tragically he was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour and passed away just 10 months later, at the age of 37. 

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Andrew Gardner and Patrick Gardner

Jason Rigby, Director of Fundraising and Supporter Care at Brain Tumour Research, has a very personal reason for working to help find a cure for brain tumours. He lost both his brother and his father to the disease. Jason was just a teenager when he lost his sibling and, some 30 years later, his father died having been diagnosed with the same type of aggressive brain tumour.

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Andrew Mackie

Andrew Mackie from Dinnet in Aberdeenshire, was a fun-loving 44-year-old who loved motorbikes. When he started having seizures in August 1999, his GP thought he may have epilepsy but six months later, when his eyesight started to deteriorate, he had a scan which revealed he had a high-grade astrocytoma brain tumour. The lorry driver and father of two girls underwent radiotherapy, surgery and palliative chemotherapy. He died at home on 21 February 2003, with his adoring family by his side.

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Andrew Williams

Andy married his childhood sweetheart and together they had two children and a lovely life. But then Andy started shaking uncontrollably, leading eventually to his diagnosis with an inoperable and incurable DIPG brain tumour, much more common among children. Radiotherapy changed his personality and his marriage broke down. Andy passed away three and a half years after his diagnosis, aged 33.

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Andy Graham

In just 18 months, Andy Graham’s life had changed beyond recognition. The 52-year-old was diagnosed with a low-grade haemangioblastoma and, despite surgery and treatment, he suffered unimaginable trauma and distress as the tumour continued to grow. Leaving behind his wife and two sons, Andy sadly passed away on New Year’s Eve 2017.

“When the operation finally went ahead in August, Andy’s ordeal didn’t stop there. He was in theatre for 11 hours and I received a call from the surgeon saying ‘if I carry on I’m going to kill him.’ They had only touched the tumour and so much blood flowed that they spent hours mopping it up. Andy had psyched himself up for this surgery for so long and it had been a disaster.”

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Andy Watts

Andy Watts was 54 and living in Ipswich, Suffolk, when he was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) following surgery which included signing up to take part in a trial of 5-ALA, the “pink drink”. A positive and upbeat person, Andy tried to jolly his family along with jokes. Although his loved ones knew his tumour was incurable and terminal, nothing could prepare them for the fact they lost him just over five months later.

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