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In Our Hearts

Less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years

These very brave people will remain in our hearts for ever and it is because of them that we are fighting to find a cure so that no other family should have to suffer in the same way.

"We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new.

We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too."

Anon

 

You are forever in our hearts.

Recently published stories

Rachael Corbishley

Rachael Corbishley was diagnosed with a brain tumour in May 2021 after having a seizure at her home in Finsbury Park, North London. She had been suffering with an earache for about two weeks. The 29-year-old underwent a cranial biopsy, which confirmed she had brain cancer, and one radiotherapy session before becoming too ill to continue the treatment. Her tumour is documented as a grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma but it is now thought she could have had a grade 4 glioblastoma (GBM). She died in the October, five months after receiving her initial diagnosis. 

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Ethan Treharne

Sports enthusiast, Ethan from Sandhurst in Berkshire was diagnosed with a glioblastoma (GBM) as he prepared for his GCSEs, aged 15. Severe headaches and slurred speech led to an MRI scan which revealed the shocking discovery of a mass on his brain. Over the course of two years, he had three operations and developed epilepsy as a result of treatment for the tumour. Desperate to save their son, parents, Nikki and Justin found treatment trials taking them to Germany and London. However, the tumour was too aggressive and Ethan died at home on 26 November 2021.

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Oliver Vivian-Price

Baby Oliver from Blackwood in South Wales was just 11 months old when he died from an extremely rare brain tumour. Despite undergoing brain surgery at 15 weeks old and seven months of gruelling chemotherapy, the tumour was too aggressive. He died on 22 July 2020, at home with his parents and older brother Harley by his side.

Since then his mum, Zara, has been working with Brain Tumour Research to raise awareness and funds to help find a cure for the disease, in the hope no other family will suffer the same devastation and loss.

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All stories

Alan Davis

Gloucestershire husband, father, and grandfather, Alan Davis, was 67 when he was diagnosed with a grade four glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour, after suffering from memory loss, and problems with his balance. Due to its size and location, surgery wasn’t an option and an intense course of radiotherapy was prescribed. Unfortunately, the treatment didn’t help and Alan died in January 2009 less than six weeks after his diagnosis.

“It was early November that year when I remember having this one conversation with dad and he just couldn’t get his words out. The quick-witted, articulate and confident man I knew was not the man that was talking to me and that’s when I insisted on taking him to the GP as this wasn’t right.”

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Alan May

It seemed nothing would tear childhood sweethearts Sandra and Alan May apart. After 30 years of married life, they were given the devastating news that Alan had a highly aggressive brain tumour. Just 10 months later, in August 2016, he passed away, leaving his parents, sister, wife, two sons and three granddaughters. Facing life without her soulmate, Sandra has run a fete in memory of her husband for the past three years, alongside a football tournament organised by her son, Shane, and has helped to raise around £5,400 for the Brain Tumour Research charity.

“My grieving process began as soon as Alan was diagnosed. It felt like somebody had ripped my heart out and, when I look back, the whole period was a total blur. It seemed as if I was on standby. My life was completely out of control, but I had to stay strong and put on a brave face for Alan. In the final days I had to agree to Alan’s wish, to stop treatment, so that he could pass peacefully away. It felt like an eternity but it was the last act of love.”

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Alan Needham

Alan was born and bred in Doncaster and worked for the civil service for over 30 years. He was very proud of his two sons, Darren and Andrew, and his three grand-daughters. Never having been a drinker or a smoker, Alan enjoyed making music most of his life. He learnt to play the euphonium as a very young boy and has played in numerous brass bands within South Yorkshire and Lincolnshire since the age of eight, as well as becoming a musical director and conductor. Alan met his partner, Sarah, and moved to Scunthorpe in 2013, a year before he was diagnosed with a GBM4 and given just months to live.

“Alan had a CT scan and could see for himself there was a big white lump in his brain.  He got his piece of paper again and wrote, “I can see that big white lump.  I know I haven’t had a stroke.”
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Albie Bayliss-Watts

Albie Bayliss-Watts, from Didcot in Oxfordshire, was just two years old when, in November 2021, he died from an aggressive brain tumour he’d been fighting for less than a year. Albie’s death has left his two mums, Lauren and Hayley, completely heart-broken. Having dedicated the last year of their lives to caring for Albie through gruelling surgeries and chemotherapy, they are now trying to deal with their grief by raising awareness and fundraising in his name.

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Alex Wilson

Alex Wilson, a lorry driver and father-of-one from Enniskillen in Northern Ireland, was  diagnosed with an aggressive, grade 4 brain tumour in June 2018. He went through two brain surgeries, radiotherapy and chemotherapy but succumbed to this terrible disease in February 2021, aged 31. Alex left behind a loving family, including his wife Jade and seven-year-old son, Ryan. 

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Alexander Paul

Alexander Paul from South London was 18 when he addressed the 2014 Conservative Party Conference and described his experience of policing policy. At the Conservative Party Conference in 2017 Theresa May informed her party that Alexander had died earlier that year from a brain tumour. Joanna Brown tells the devastating story of her son’s illness, the awful impact on her and the loss to society of a gifted individual who had so much to give.

“It is this sense of crushing loss, this waste of potential, that haunt my days. He did so much but could have done so much more. I did everything I could but I couldn’t save my son and our tragedy is a wider tragedy as society needs people like my son, Alexander.

I am angry and full of what ifs but we have his poetry, his humanity and his spirit as his legacy. We didn’t discuss his mortality, he didn’t leave us letters but he left us his prose and that comforts me. A book of his work was published a year on from his death and he would have been proud of that.”

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Alexandra Foulis

Our Fundraising Group, Alexandra’s Angels, is inspired by the story of Alexandra Foulis who died at the age of 24. Known to loved ones as Ally, she was a fun, outgoing and confident young woman whose life ended far too soon. She underwent surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy to halt a grade 3 astrocytoma but Ally passed away in August 2011. Through Alexandra’s Angels, her sisters Melissa and Rebecca are keeping Ally’s memory alive and funding the fight against brain tumours in her name.

“Not only had the tumour returned but it was back larger than before, now measuring 7cm. What’s worse, it was inoperable because it was too close to the nerves that controlled her breathing and heart-rate. We were all devastated to learn the tumour was now terminal. Ally being Ally, tried to lift the mood, saying: ‘Well, it ain’t over till the fat lady sings, and I ain’t singing yet!’”

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Alison Blackwell

Alison Blackwell, from Brighouse in West Yorkshire, spent many years working as a successful graphic designer and art director for a clothing catalogue before going into the millinery business with her husband, Joe. Joe’s long-established family tradition of working in the hat trade combined with Alison’s fashion background, eye for colour and design flair, meant the couple made the perfect team. However, tragedy struck in December 2021, when Alison was diagnosed with an aggressive, inoperable brain tumour. She died just four weeks later, on New Year’s Day 2022, leaving Joe and their 18-year-old daughter Libby devastated. 

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Alison Phelan

The year 2000 approached - a new millennium and a new beginning. New years always made me sad, looking back at our happy life wondering what was ahead. 

In May I became unsettled but didn’t know why, when my life was so complete. Then I became aware that Alison had developed a subtle incomplete movement in her eye that only a mother would notice. I took her to the doctor who referred me to an optician who said it was common and would correct itself.

Gary and I would talk and talk about it.  I knew something was wrong.  I went back to the doctor then to another optician. “Please someone listen to me”.  I started to make Gary nervous.  He knew I knew the children so well.

I went to a third optician - Gary was on a school trip with one of the boys but I went on the spur of the moment.  I hated this feeling in my stomach telling me to act and act now!

They did test after test, and then told me to go to A&E with a letter that something was making the muscles in her eye deteriorate. Gary was only 5 minutes away; we dropped the boys off and went to the hospital. They said they couldn’t see anything but told us to go to a leading eye hospital the next day.
 
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Aman Sumal

We are grateful to Aman, and his brother Anoop, who worked with us in October 2021 to share his story here. Sadly, he passed away in December 2021. We remember Aman as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. He will be forever in our hearts.

Young father Aman Sumal had everything to look forward to when he was diagnosed with a brain tumour after suffering a seizure and headaches in August 2020. Initially, it was thought he had a low-grade tumour and he was given anti-seizure medication and referred for three-monthly scans. However, after having another seizure five months later, an MRI showed areas of concern and he underwent debulking surgery, with COVID-19 restrictions preventing anyone from being by his side. A biopsy of his tumour revealed that it was, in fact, a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and the 36-year-old, of Ruislip in West London, underwent chemotherapy and intensive radiotherapy while his family privately funded a protocol with a naturopath from Australia. Sadly, Aman has continued to deteriorate and, having now exhausted all his options on the NHS, his family have turned to crowdfunding to raise the money needed to pay for private immunotherapy treatment and specifically-formulated vaccines.

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