Together we will find a cure Donate
Together we will find a cure Donate

In Our Hearts

Less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years

These very brave people will remain in our hearts for ever and it is because of them that we are fighting to find a cure so that no other family should have to suffer in the same way.

We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new.


We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too.


Anon

You are forever in our hearts.

Recently published stories

Andrew Gardner and Patrick Gardner

Jason Rigby, Director of Fundraising and Supporter Care at Brain Tumour Research, has a very personal reason for working to help find a cure for brain tumours. He lost both his brother and his father to the disease. Jason was just a teenager when he lost his sibling and, some 30 years later, his father died having been diagnosed with the same type of aggressive brain tumour.

Read more

Blaise Nelson

Blaise Nelson was diagnosed with multiple brain tumours in February 2018, at the age of just six. The schoolboy from Didsbury in Greater Manchester underwent major surgery and extensive treatment, including a clinical trial, to try to prolong his life. Tragically, his treatment options eventually ran out and he died at home in October 2019, leaving behind his devastated parents Rachel and Chris and three siblings, including his four-year-old sister, Asha. 

Read more

Lydia Carfrae-Brohaska

After experiencing numbness in her hands in summer 2018, Lydia Carfrae-Brohaska was suspected to have multiple sclerosis, a condition which also affects her mum. However, scans revealed a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) – one of the most aggressive types of brain tumour – to be the cause. Thirty-five-year-old Lydia (known as Lyd), who lost movement on one side and relied on a wheelchair, then underwent vigorous treatment for her incurable brain cancer. 

Read more

All stories

Alan Needham

Alan was born and bred in Doncaster and worked for the civil service for over 30 years. He was very proud of his two sons, Darren and Andrew, and his three grand-daughters. Never having been a drinker or a smoker, Alan enjoyed making music most of his life. He learnt to play the euphonium as a very young boy and has played in numerous brass bands within South Yorkshire and Lincolnshire since the age of eight, as well as becoming a musical director and conductor. Alan met his partner, Sarah, and moved to Scunthorpe in 2013, a year before he was diagnosed with a GBM4 and given just months to live.

“Alan had a CT scan and could see for himself there was a big white lump in his brain.  He got his piece of paper again and wrote, “I can see that big white lump.  I know I haven’t had a stroke.”
Read more

Alexander Paul

Alexander Paul from South London was 18 when he addressed the 2014 Conservative Party Conference and described his experience of policing policy. At the Conservative Party Conference in 2017 Theresa May informed her party that Alexander had died earlier that year from a brain tumour. Joanna Brown tells the devastating story of her son’s illness, the awful impact on her and the loss to society of a gifted individual who had so much to give.

“It is this sense of crushing loss, this waste of potential, that haunt my days. He did so much but could have done so much more. I did everything I could but I couldn’t save my son and our tragedy is a wider tragedy as society needs people like my son, Alexander.

I am angry and full of what ifs but we have his poetry, his humanity and his spirit as his legacy. We didn’t discuss his mortality, he didn’t leave us letters but he left us his prose and that comforts me. A book of his work was published a year on from his death and he would have been proud of that.”

Read more

Alexandra Foulis

Our Fundraising Group, Alexandra’s Angels, is inspired by the story of Alexandra Foulis who died at the age of 24. Known to loved ones as Ally, she was a fun, outgoing and confident young woman whose life ended far too soon. She underwent surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy to halt a grade 3 astrocytoma but Ally passed away in August 2011. Through Alexandra’s Angels, her sisters Melissa and Rebecca are keeping Ally’s memory alive and funding the fight against brain tumours in her name.

“Not only had the tumour returned but it was back larger than before, now measuring 7cm. What’s worse, it was inoperable because it was too close to the nerves that controlled her breathing and heart-rate. We were all devastated to learn the tumour was now terminal. Ally being Ally, tried to lift the mood, saying: ‘Well, it ain’t over till the fat lady sings, and I ain’t singing yet!’”

Read more

Alison Phelan

The year 2000 approached - a new millennium and a new beginning. New years always made me sad, looking back at our happy life wondering what was ahead. 

In May I became unsettled but didn’t know why, when my life was so complete. Then I became aware that Alison had developed a subtle incomplete movement in her eye that only a mother would notice. I took her to the doctor who referred me to an optician who said it was common and would correct itself.

Gary and I would talk and talk about it.  I knew something was wrong.  I went back to the doctor then to another optician. “Please someone listen to me”.  I started to make Gary nervous.  He knew I knew the children so well.

I went to a third optician - Gary was on a school trip with one of the boys but I went on the spur of the moment.  I hated this feeling in my stomach telling me to act and act now!

They did test after test, and then told me to go to A&E with a letter that something was making the muscles in her eye deteriorate. Gary was only 5 minutes away; we dropped the boys off and went to the hospital. They said they couldn’t see anything but told us to go to a leading eye hospital the next day.
 
Read more

Amita Charavda

Along with her husband Mahendra, Amita had owned a shop called “Lucky Jewellers” on Belgrave Road – Leicester’s Golden Mile for nearly 40 years.  She was looking forward to enjoying retirement and having more leisure time to spend with family and enjoy lovely holidays.  Tragically, she passed away from a brain tumour, aged 55, just three months after diagnosis.

Here is Amita’s story as told by her daughter, Sneha…

“The speed in which we lost Mum was so shocking.  I couldn’t believe that in this day and age Mum could have something which was incurable.”
 
Read more

Amy Quin

We are grateful to Amy who worked with us in May 2017 to share their story here. Sadly, she passed away in 2019. We remember Amy as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. She will be forever in our hearts.

Determined mum Amy Quin will mark the first anniversary of her brain tumour diagnosis by skydiving 15,000ft from a plane with her sisters. The trio are raising money for the charity Brain Tumour Research. With a prognosis of five to seven years, Amy is hopeful that research will help to identify new treatments which would mean her tumour is operable giving her precious time with her family including partner Lewis and their four-year-old son Hector.


Read more

Andrea Thursfield

Andrea passed away just nine months after being diagnosed with a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour. She was 46. The mother of a teenager and much-loved partner of Nick Butler, she underwent surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy but could not be saved. She and Nick had a short-lived romance as teenagers and then met again by chance 21 years later.

Nick tells Andrea’s story …

I first met Andrea when I was 19. We went out a couple of times but then I went away to work and we lost touch. More than two decades had gone by and we had both had our 40th birthdays by the time we met again by chance in July 2005. We bumped into each other in a pub. I had always hoped that somehow, somewhere, I would see her again but had no idea what she was doing or where she was. It turns out that, unknowingly, we lived very close to each other in Perton, Wolverhampton. She tottered over on her heels and we chatted, it ended up with her inviting me round for a cup of tea and she said: “Don’t cock it up this time!” It seems we both held a candle for each other after all that time. She had a young son, Ryan, from a previous relationship but neither of us had married. Things moved on and we each sold our houses in order to buy a property together to make a home for us and Ryan.
 
Read more

Andrew Atkinson-Whitton

Andrew Atkinson-Whitton loved life. In his 37 years, he touched so many lives with his infectious smile and happy-go lucky nature. Andrew kept smiling even when he was diagnosed with a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and had to undergo intensive surgery and treatment but the tumour was too aggressive. He died 20 July 2018, just 14 months after diagnosis, leaving his husband Carl, mum Jill and brother Robert.

Read more

Andrew Gardner and Patrick Gardner

Jason Rigby, Director of Fundraising and Supporter Care at Brain Tumour Research, has a very personal reason for working to help find a cure for brain tumours. He lost both his brother and his father to the disease. Jason was just a teenager when he lost his sibling and, some 30 years later, his father died having been diagnosed with the same type of aggressive brain tumour.

Read more

Andrew Williams

Andy married his childhood sweetheart and together they had two children and a lovely life. But then Andy started shaking uncontrollably, leading eventually to his diagnosis with an inoperable and incurable DIPG brain tumour, much more common among children. Radiotherapy changed his personality and his marriage broke down. Andy passed away three and a half years after his diagnosis, aged 33.

Read more

Donate today

Help us build the UK's largest network of experts in sustainable brain tumour research and campaign for more investment nationally. Together we will find a cure.

£10
£25
£50
£100