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In Our Hearts

Less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years

These very brave people will remain in our hearts for ever and it is because of them that we are fighting to find a cure so that no other family should have to suffer in the same way.

We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new.


We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too.


Anon

You are forever in our hearts.

Recently published stories

Michelle Noakes

In August 2019, mum-of-two Michelle Noakes, from Bow in East London, had her ultimate dream wedding to her beloved husband, Simon. They were surrounded by their friends and family, with their young children Otto and Poppy there to take part in their special day. Only a few months later, however, their world would come crashing down when Michelle was diagnosed with an aggressive and inoperable brain tumour. Determined to defy her stark prognosis, Michelle underwent standard of care NHS treatment, as well as private therapies, but sadly her condition worsened and eventually, her options ran out. She died at home in June 2021, aged 39, leaving her loved ones devastated. Her family feel strongly that there needs to be more funding for research to find better treatments so that other young children do not lose their mum in this way.

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Chloe Clayton

Chloe from Worcestershire died exactly a year after she was diagnosed with a rare grade 4 brain tumour. She began to experience painful headaches and after trips back and forth to the GP, she was finally referred for an MRI scan which revealed devastating news of a mass on her brain. Months of radiotherapy couldn’t compete with the aggressiveness of the tumour and the cancer spread and Chloe died on 15 September 2016 at the age of 19, surrounded by her family. Six years after her death, her brother, Jordan is fundraising to help fund the fight and find a cure for the deadly disease.

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Michael Crayford

Michael Crayford, of Gillingham in Kent, was diagnosed with a rare immature teratoma, a type of intracranial germ cell tumour (GCT), in September 2016 after suffering with sudden headaches, blurred vision, sickness and balance problems. He underwent five brain surgeries, intensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy but died six months later, in March 2017. He was just 13 years old.

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All stories

Aaron Irvine

Aaron was first diagnosed with a brain tumour at the age of two and a half, but not without his mother having to fight for six months to get doctors to take his symptoms seriously.  The operation and subsequent radiotherapy left him with lots of physical and educational disabilities, but he got on with life and never complained.  At the age of 29 his tumour came back – his mother (who has her own disabilities) had to fight to get any support for him. Aaron passed away five months later in 2011.  Read more

Aaron Wood

Student Aaron Wood died at the age of 24, four years after being diagnosed with what was thought to be a low-grade brain tumour, which later turned out to be a grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma. He had undergone surgery and radiotherapy, and went back to uni to complete his studies to graduate with a 2:1 in philosophy. His dying wish, for scientists to use his brain to further their knowledge of brain tumours, was fulfilled. His mum Crystal hopes that his story will inspire others to never give up.

“Aaron saved my life before he was even born. I had a car accident when I was four months pregnant and it was a wake-up call, the moment I realised I had to start taking care of myself for the sake of my unborn child. A brain tumour robbed Aaron of the prime of his life and robbed me of my sunshine. It is so painful to think he saved me by giving me something to live for and yet, 24 years later, I was unable to save him.”
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Abigail Burrows

Welsh toddler Abigail Burrows was 21 months old when, in April 1996, she was diagnosed with an aggressive brain tumour. She died shortly after an operation to remove it, just six days after the diagnosis. Her brothers, Grant and Dale, were 13 and 11 when she died and her mum Kazzy was seven months pregnant with her younger brother Sam, who was born seven weeks to the day after her tragic death. Kazzy, originally from Swansea, but now living in Pembrokeshire, went on to have another daughter, Poppy, born in 1997 and she also has a stepson, Will, now 26. The pain of losing a child has never left her and not a day goes by when she doesn’t remember her ‘extraordinary’ little girl, Abby. This month, Kazzy, now a grandmother-of-two, is taking part in the 10,000 Steps a Day in February challenge in memory of her daughter and to help prevent other families from experiencing such devastation. 

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Abigail Lightbown

The first signs that there was anything wrong with our daughter began around the end of August 2010 when Abigail started being sick every morning.  Doctors prescribed a number of different medications to treat her for acid reflux, but none seemed to help and, by the middle of October, she had lost over half a stone in weight as her appetite had diminished.  It was at this point that we did briefly consider whether she had an eating disorder and even chased her upstairs on one occasion to check whether she was making herself sick.

Over the following weeks and months, Abigail underwent a series of tests, including a comprehensive examination of her eyes, but all came back clear, even the eye test, which can be a key method for indicating the presence of certain types of brain tumours.

Finally, an MRI scan was booked for 18th February 2011, but not long before this was to happen, Abigail collapsed and was taken to Bolton Royal Hospital. Doctors performed various manual dexterity tests on Abigail which all came up as normal and as the scan was booked for a few days later they decided to wait.  It was only then, at the age of nine, that she was finally diagnosed with a medulloblastoma brain tumour, around 20 weeks after we first had taken her to the GP about her vomiting.
 
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Adam Barclay

Adam and Emma met through their mutual love of cars. They had settled down with two small children, were happy at work, very much in love and engaged to be married. Despite numerous doctor’s appointments and hospital visits, Adam’s symptoms were repeatedly dismissed. By the time his brain tumour was diagnosed it was too late. He had several massive seizures and underwent emergency surgery. Adam died on New Year’s Day 2016 without regaining consciousness. He was just 27. 

“Adam’s symptoms were repeatedly dismissed as nothing serious. As the brain tumour grew, he had a series of massive seizures. He went into surgery but never woke up. We had been planning our wedding but now I’m alone at 24 and my children are left without their daddy. Our lives have been destroyed and it is all so unnecessary – had he been diagnosed earlier he would still be with us now.”
 
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Adam Bradford

We are grateful to Adam who worked with us in October 2017 to share his story here. Sadly, he passed away on 23rd December 2019. We remember Adam as we continue our work to raise awareness of this devastating disease and to fund research to help find a cure. He will be forever in our hearts.

A seizure struck Adam down out of the blue and led to his brain tumour diagnosis. He underwent surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy and was well enough to take part in a gruelling cycle challenge in the heat of the Arizona desert. He completed the event with his father who, 15 years earlier, had lost his mother to a brain tumour.

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Adam Forster

A farmer and keen hunting man, Adam was diagnosed with a high-grade glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour. Surgery was not an option and he underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy but passed away at home 11 months later, at the age of 42.

“Somehow Adam found the strength to cope. He was a trooper and his concern was always for others. His tumour was a grade four glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the worst it could possibly be. I don't think Adam really knew how high-grade his tumour was, but he was aware that it was inoperable and the prognosis was bleak; he had probably just two years to live, five years at best. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy began and that took us up to March and he lived for just two months after that.”

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Adrian Vitoria

Director Adrian Vitoria was shooting a film in the States when he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. He underwent surgery and self-funded pioneering new treatment, continuing to work on what was to be his final project while having chemotherapy. Adrian returned to Suffolk in the later stages of his illness. He passed away in November 2016 at the age 48.

“I don’t think people are aware of how cruel this disease is. It was torture for me to watch as Adrian was robbed of his mobility and his faculties especially as he was such a great communicator. He became bedridden, unable to even lift his head. It was an agonisingly slow decline as my brother became locked-in as the tumour grew.”

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Aidan Linden

Our first born child, Aidan, was just 16 months old when he first became ill.  He was diagnosed with a variety of different infections, but five weeks later we were given the horrific news he had an aggressive medulloblastoma brain tumour which had also spread into his spinal cord.  Aidan was given the best treatment options available at the time and fought a brave battle, but despite everything, we still lost him just one month shy of his fifth birthday.  Now we want to raise awareness and help prevent other children from having to face a similar fate.

“Research into paediatric brain tumours and how to treat them effectively is the only thing that can save the lives of other children like Aidan.  A greater understanding of how the different tumour cells develop, as well as discovering more effective treatments that target those specific cells, will not only reduce mortality, but will also improve the quality of life of children who survive brain tumours.”

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Alan Davis

Gloucestershire husband, father, and grandfather, Alan Davis, was 67 when he was diagnosed with a grade four glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour, after suffering from memory loss, and problems with his balance. Due to its size and location, surgery wasn’t an option and an intense course of radiotherapy was prescribed. Unfortunately, the treatment didn’t help and Alan died in January 2009 less than six weeks after his diagnosis.

“It was early November that year when I remember having this one conversation with dad and he just couldn’t get his words out. The quick-witted, articulate and confident man I knew was not the man that was talking to me and that’s when I insisted on taking him to the GP as this wasn’t right.”

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