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In Hope

Just 1% of the national research spend has been allocated to this devastating disease

The diagnosis of a brain tumour is devastating, however there is hope. We have been fortunate to meet some very brave people who have survived to tell the tale and who want to share their story to give hope to others.

Recently published stories

Luke Webber

Luke Webber had suffered with headaches and double vision for about a year before being diagnosed with a low-grade craniopharyngioma in 2020 at the age of 12. Now 15, Luke , from Stevenage in Hertfordshire, has undergone two surgeries and proton beam therapy, and is being monitored with regular scans. He has been left with a number of lifechanging chronic conditions.

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Anna Binks

Anna Binks, 43, from East Yorkshire, had an MRI scan in 2010 after blood tests revealed high prolactin levels. The scan found a suspected low-grade glioma which doctors were happy to monitor with regular scans. Ten years later, the mum-of-two started suffering from headaches and dizzy spells. She had another scan which found she had a diffuse astrocytoma brain tumour. Anna’s son, Jacob, seven, has taken on Brain Tumour Research’s One Million Keepy Uppy Challenge along with his teammates at South Cave Under 8’s Blacks to help fund a cure.

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Matt Schlag

Matt Schlag, 44, from York, started getting regular migraines so severe they were affecting his behaviour. After concerns from his manager, Matt got an MRI scan which revealed an anaplastic astrocytoma brain tumour. Matt, dad to Reuben, two, and Anja, five, has gone through two operations, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. He’s now working with Brain Tumour Research and raised £3,000 after successfully completing the London to Brighton cycle ride in September 2022.

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All stories

Carrie-Ann Greenwood

Carrie-Ann Greenwood, from Holywell in Flintshire, North Wales, was 36 weeks pregnant when a sudden loss of vision on her right side prompted her to visit her optician. She was referred for an MRI scan, which revealed a golf ball-sized tumour on her pituitary gland.

The diagnosis in May 2016 led to an emergency caesarean section to deliver her daughter Cerys, followed by brain surgery just days later.

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Catherine Heald

It took four months of headaches gradually getting worse before Catherine was finally diagnosed. One day she had such blinding pain on the left side of her head that her husband called an ambulance and she was taken to A&E. Catherine was given a CT scan, leading to the discovery that she had a brain tumour, which later turned out to be a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

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Catherine Wilcockson

Mum-of-three Catherine Wilcockson had not been feeling herself and was mistakenly prescribed anti-depressants to treat her symptoms. After a couple of episodes of ‘blacking out’ and then a massive seizure in May 2019, it was finally discovered that she had a brain tumour. The 37-year-old from Sheffield has undergone an awake craniotomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy and, since her recovery, has dedicated herself to fundraising for Brain Tumour Research. Remarkably, Catherine feels like her diagnosis has given her a new lease of life

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Catrin Ireland

Number 13 definitely turned out to be unlucky for me – I was diagnosed with a meningioma brain tumour on our 13th wedding anniversary.  Surgery left me with vision and balance issues – I feel very dizzy walking any distance and suffer with extreme fatigue which means I regularly find myself needing to sleep during the day.  Obviously, I had to give up my driving licence.  I now get around on a mobility scooter which isn’t what I ever imagined I would be doing aged 41 as I am now.

“It seemed completely surreal when I heard the words ‘brain tumour’ as that thought hadn’t even entered my head.  I found myself pacing the corridors of the hospital, crying and swearing (which isn’t like me), while my husband kept trying to hug me.  The date was the 23rd May – a day I will always remember because we should have been celebrating  our 13th Wedding Anniversary!”
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Chae Jenkins

After suffering with migraines during his recovery from leg lengthening surgery, in January 2020, Chae from Bude in Cornwall was given a CT scan which showed a lesion on his brain and he was diagnosed with a rare pilocytic astrocytoma. Inoperable due to its location, Chae had a biopsy which showed the tumour, initially thought to be grade 4 was in fact low-grade and he received combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment followed by a gruelling six months of chemotherapy. After having to give up his dream of playing rugby professionally, 22-year-old Chae now relies on the full-time care of his mother, Maggie and is left with limited mobility and sight problems. Chae wants to share his story to help raise awareness of what it’s like to live with a brain tumour to help people understand how they can support a loved one after diagnosis.

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Charlie Boutwood

Charlie was the much wanted son of his parents. They already had two daughters and he completed their happy family. At 20 months he faced the terrifying prospect of surgery to remove an enormous and malignant brain tumour. Miraculously he made a remarkable recovery. Read more

Charlie Clayton

Having ruled out meningitis as the cause of his headaches and vomiting, 10-year-old Charlie, who has a twin sister, was scanned. A mass was discovered which turned out to be a craniopharyngioma brain tumour. He underwent surgery and proton beam therapy and is now on hormone replacement medication and hoping he won’t need further surgery or treatment.

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Charlie Cox

Charlie Cox, from Morden, was just eight months old when he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. Now a bouncy, fun-loving eight-year-old, his tumour has recurred three times. He has faced countless hospital appointments, operations and chemotherapy throughout his childhood but his mum Kirsty, 32, is desperate to keep life for Charlie and his brother Freddie, four, as normal as possible. Read more

Charlie Pudney

Charlie was just seven-years-old when he was diagnosed with an ependymoma. The tumour was successfully removed in surgery but, as there was a high chance of regrowth, Charlie and his family travelled to the States for nine weeks of Proton Beam Therapy. Now back at school and enjoying football once more, Charlie is well and undergoes regular scans. The experience has changed the life of his family forever.

“Charlie is the same little boy as he was before although, emotionally, the experience has changed us. We live for now and don’t take anything for granted. I am angry and frustrated to think that brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer … yet just 1% of the national spend on cancer research has been allocated to this devastating disease. This is such a complex disease and although I understand this makes diagnosis and treatment so difficult, it affects so many young people that this is precisely why more needs to be done.”
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Charlie Sharpe

Social media account executive Charlie Sharpe, from Central London, is celebrating being cancer free following a shock brain tumour diagnosis in 2019. The 25-year-old, who grew up in Epsom, Surrey, was diagnosed with a type of germ cell tumour (GCT) called a germinoma after a Specsavers optician referred him for an MRI scan, which detected his tumour. Charlie underwent proton beam therapy, which was successful and he has now been given the all-clear, although continues to be monitored with annual scans. He is back at work part-time and has galvanised his colleagues to join him in supporting Brain Tumour Research to help support others affected by the disease. 

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