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Together we will find a cure Donate

In Hope

Just 1% of the national research spend has been allocated to this devastating disease

The diagnosis of a brain tumour is devastating, however there is hope. We have been fortunate to meet some very brave people who have survived to tell the tale and who want to share their story to give hope to others.

Recently published stories

Lily Wythe

Lily, from Eastwood near Southend in Essex, was just 13 when she was diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). Her family, which includes her parents Diane and Martin and her younger brother Josh, were told that the tumour was inoperable and the only treatment available was radiotherapy to give her a few extra months until the tumour began to grow again. They were told to go home and make memories. The Wythes have since found a promising clinical trial in the United States and are hoping to raise the hundreds of thousands needed to secure what could be life-saving treatment.

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Lyra Cole

Lyra was just five months old when she underwent emergency surgery to remove her tumour, a low-grade choroid plexus papilloma. Initially misdiagnosed as a virus, her symptoms had included a loss of appetite and vomiting. Now six, Lyra has released a cover of Christmas classic When A Child is Born, with funds being donated to the charity Brain Tumour Research.

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Laura Skerritt

Laura was just 21 when she was diagnosed with a low-grade brain tumour. The swimming instructor and keen horse rider had suffered from debilitating symptoms for more than two years, including migraines, sickness, and psychosis, which were misdiagnosed as a mental illness. A year on from her diagnosis, she is still adjusting to life as a brain tumour patient. She’s at a crossroads as she decides whether to have further treatment.  Her plans of moving into her own home and thinking about a family have been thrown into the air.

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All stories

Kelly Ann Alexander

Devoted to her husband and her horse, Kelly Ann was turned away from A&E when her brain tumour symptoms were dismissed as the effects of too much drink. Eventually diagnosed with a low-grade oligodendroglioma brain tumour, Kelly Ann went through surgery and had part of her skull replaced when a serious infection threatened her life. Two years later, the tumour was found to have regrown and Kelly Ann had radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

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Kelly Lee

Kelly was newly-wed and just 29 when she was diagnosed with a tumour on her pituitary gland. It was successfully removed during surgery but she estimates it took a full three years for her to recover completely. Kelly’s sister, Olympic swimmer Katy Sexton MBE, was among family and friends who helped Kelly through her illness. Katy is now organising fundraising events for Brain Tumour Research through her swimming academy.

“Being diagnosed with a brain tumour has changed my life for the better. It has strengthened my marriage, increased my confidence and motivated me to start my own business.”
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Kerri Parker

Kerri Parker, from Dereham, Norwich runs The Kerri Parker Model Academy helping thousands of aspiring models start out or further their modelling careers. Kerri herself is an award-winning model and has competed in pageants around the world. She was diagnosed with two different types of brain tumour during the winter of 2013 just before her 30th birthday.  Read more

Kevin Pemberton

When Wolverhampton dad-of-two Kevin Pemberton, 38, began suffering from sinus problems, he never imagined a brain tumour was the root of his symptoms. Having faced debulking surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy since his diagnosis in April 2019, Kevin is now back at work as a management accountant. While coming to terms with the fact his illness is incurable, Kevin is trying to keep life as normal as possible for his wife Michelle and their two daughters, 11-year-old Jasmine and Sofia, six.

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Kian Jones

The life of schoolboy Kian Jones was saved by his mother’s determination to pursue an accurate diagnosis of her son’s headaches and sickness. Trainee nurse Sabina’s relentless demands for a brain scan proved her instincts were correct. Kian’s condition was life threatening and he underwent emergency surgery. He is now settling back into “normal” life. Read more

Kirsty Barton

Just three weeks after starting her new job, Kirsty Barton, 28, was diagnosed with a brain tumour. The mum-of-two endured surgery in May 2019 which removed most of the tumour and now she is doing well. Kirsty’s diagnosis made her realise how precious life can be and she hopes that other patients will be inspired by her story.

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Laura Liver

After experiencing hot flushes and dizzy spells, 29-year-old Laura Liver thought she was coming down with virus, however she received the devastating news that she had a brain tumour. After undergoing invasive surgery and treatment over the last 18 months to control the growth of the tumour, Laura is determined to make the most of life and enjoy every precious moment as she heads towards her milestone 30th birthday.

“With Marc and my mum and dad by my side we were shown my scans and I let out a gasp. There was a black mass, the size of an apple, on the left-hand side of my brain and it was then the consultant confirmed it was definitely a tumour. I just remember mum crying next to me as Marc held my hand.”

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Laura Skerritt

Laura was just 21 when she was diagnosed with a low-grade brain tumour. The swimming instructor and keen horse rider had suffered from debilitating symptoms for more than two years, including migraines, sickness, and psychosis, which were misdiagnosed as a mental illness. A year on from her diagnosis, she is still adjusting to life as a brain tumour patient. She’s at a crossroads as she decides whether to have further treatment.  Her plans of moving into her own home and thinking about a family have been thrown into the air.

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Leah Martin

Leah was diagnosed with a high-grade medulloblastoma brain tumour at the age of two. She has undergone several operations and a gruelling regime of high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Now at pre-school, Leah has long-term side effects including problems with her speech and mobility.

“Our little girl was so diminished by the treatment that I pleaded with her consultant not to go ahead with the last two sessions. I felt I could no longer put her through the daily ordeal of a general anaesthetic, of being taken from my arms and laid down on what seemed to me to be a cold slab, and pinned down by a face mask. In the end, I felt we had to trust the doctors and Leah did complete the course of 31 sessions over six weeks. For Leah it was normality and she probably assumed everyone did it; it was worse for us.”
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Lily Hawkins

Lily’s Mum, Lorraine is a trained and experienced midwife, but nothing could prepare her for the day when her six-year-old daughter was diagnosed with a brain tumour, many months after she first started displaying worrying signs which were repeatedly dismissed by doctors. Now Lorraine is determined to raise awareness particularly of the symptoms of brain tumours to ensure that patients are given the earliest possible diagnosis. Read more

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