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Together we will find a cure Donate

In Hope

Just 1% of the national research spend has been allocated to this devastating disease

The diagnosis of a brain tumour is devastating, however there is hope. We have been fortunate to meet some very brave people who have survived to tell the tale and who want to share their story to give hope to others.

Recently published stories

Jim Murphy

Jim started to experience symptoms after the UK went into lockdown during the coronavirus pandemic. He was staggered to be told that - like his wife 18 years previously, whom he has cared for ever since - he had a brain tumour. Despite the burden placed on the NHS as a result of Covid-19, Jim was diagnosed, underwent surgery and started treatment within weeks. He is sharing his story of optimism to bring hope to others.

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Ben Hurd

Ben Hurd is 33 and is living with a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme brain tumour. He has been told that the coronavirus pandemic means his ongoing chemotherapy and next MRI scan will be delayed and is worried that time is against him.

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Sam Suriakumar

Doting husband and father Sam, who is a self-employed recruitment consultant and part-time musician, was diagnosed with a brain tumour after being taken ill on his commute home from work. He is now hoping to inspire others to embrace the moment and make every day count.

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All stories

James Hudd

James is a 39-year-old self-employed television sound engineer, who grew up and lives in south east London, where he counts himself lucky to be surrounded by lots of close family and friends. Previously a busy professional, with a hectic social life that came with his career in TV, everything changed for James in September 2018, when he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. Operations, radiotherapy and chemotherapy followed, and nights out to the pub during work trips away have since diminished. In November 2019, approaching the end of his planned 12 cycles of chemotherapy, James started writing a retrospective blog, to document his brain tumour story so far. He hopes by publishing his experiences he will help inform, entertain and inspire others who have received a similar diagnosis.

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James Wardle

University student James was diagnosed with a low-grade brain tumour after he started to have nocturnal seizures. He has managed to continue his studies in mechanical engineering and will run the London Marathon 2018 for Brain Tumour Research.

“The London Marathon has always been number one on my bucket list and as there is no better time than now I am going to be taking part this year. I will be running for the charity Brain Tumour Research. For obvious reasons it is a charity very close to my heart and, as well as raising money, I hope to raise awareness of the startling statistics around this disease.

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Jay Lynchehaun

In October 2011, aged 25, Jay was diagnosed with a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme brain tumour (GBM4). He was given a prognosis of six months. More than six years on, while still on three-monthly scans, Jay is a devoted husband to Becky and dedicated father to Teddy, born in January 2017. He has a job he enjoys, working part-time as a graphic designer.

“Two weeks later we were given the histology results. Jay had a grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme. We went home in an agonising whirl to do our own research. It was not good reading. I quickly realised that the best way to cope was to look for the positives. I voraciously read the stories of patients who had good outcomes and ignored the negative ones. Regrettably, these were far and few between.”

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Jay Wheeler

Although Jay's brain tumour was completely removed during surgery, he then had to undergo radiotherapy and chemo, leaving him with a number of different side effects. Despite his agonising ordeal he is looking forward to starting his degree course in Animation and Special Effects Read more

Jess Richardson

Hard working wife and mum Jess Richardson was used to managing on her own while her husband worked overseas. He missed out on the birth of their daughter Isla-Rose, but was airlifted home when, out of the blue, Jess was diagnosed with a brain tumour. She took part in a clinical trial and then underwent Gamma Knife surgery, which to date has successfully shrunk the tumour by around two thirds. Jess believes Isla has been her saving grace because having her means that there is no other option than for Jess to be well. She will not leave her daughter without her mum; that’s non-negotiable.

“Now, with the great gift of hindsight, it’s hard to imagine how I could have been so calm about things. Darren was away, I had an eleven-month-old baby to look after but it never really crossed my mind that something might be seriously wrong. I had an MRI scan the first week in February and the call that changed our lives came the following day. You know where you think to yourself ‘knowing my luck I’ll find out I’ve got a brain tumour?’ Well, that’s what happened to me and it’s no joke. I was at home on my own late on a Friday afternoon when the consultant called to say they had found something on my brain and I needed to see my GP immediately. Darren was in Iraq and I sat with Isla on my knee as a doctor I had never met before told me I had a brain tumour. The doctor said he shouldn’t have been the one to tell me the news but, believe me, hearing the news has to be far worse than telling someone.”

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Jess Taylor

Jess was just 13 years old when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour. She has endured two craniotomies and numerous rounds of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Despite her poor prognosis all those years ago, with the help of her neurosurgeons and doctors, Jess is now 19 years old and studying at college to become a beautician. Read more

Jim Murphy

Jim started to experience symptoms after the UK went into lockdown during the coronavirus pandemic. He was staggered to be told that - like his wife 18 years previously, whom he has cared for ever since - he had a brain tumour. Despite the burden placed on the NHS as a result of Covid-19, Jim was diagnosed, underwent surgery and started treatment within weeks. He is sharing his story of optimism to bring hope to others.

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Jim Murray

For retired police officer Jim Murray, 53, and his wife Ally, it was a devastating blow to learn his brain tumour had returned. His tumour, a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), brings with it the dire prognosis of just 12 – 18 months. Now two years after his initial diagnosis, Jim and Ally are making the most of every day by travelling and spending time with their three sons Callum, Simon and Richard, and their grandchildren.

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Jo Barlow

Jo struggled to receive the right help from her GP when, in her early 40s, she suffered from bouts of pain and dizziness. She opted to go private and was diagnosed with a haemangioblastoma in her cerebellum. Balancing her distrust of doctors and undergoing brain surgery was a paradoxical conundrum. The difficulties she experienced during and after surgery motivated her to write a book about her challenges and the importance of a positive attitude.                                            

“I believe that I’m a much stronger person. I feel a lot of gratitude and don’t stress too much. I’m quite emotional and cry a lot but then I also think: why not? I went through a lot, I survived brain surgery, I have a lot to say.”

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Jodie Bentley

Jodie, 35, was diagnosed with a brain tumour and had surgery just before Christmas in 2016. Now, two years on from her diagnosis, she is celebrating a series of clear MRI scans, and is looking forward to a rather more relaxed Christmas with her partner Barry and their two daughters Ruby and Darcy.

“The positivity from my friends and family has helped me through the inevitable dark days and I’ve realised just how much I have to live for. I’m really looking forward to a stress-free Christmas; the past two years I’ve felt fraught with worry about my diagnosis and now, on the back of my positive scans, I think we’ll finally be able to relax and enjoy the day. It’s a very special time of year and I’m so grateful I’m here to share it with Barry and our girls.”

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