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Research News

National brain tumour research funding needs to increase to £30-35 million a year

Plymouth Centre hosts Research Symposium

The Brain Tumour Research Centre of Excellence at the University of Plymouth hosted its second annual Research Symposium yesterday showcasing the innovative research being undertaken at the Centre.

Clinicians from local NHS Trusts, Plymouth and Bristol, as well as research scientists and medical students from the University of Plymouth, heard from keynote speakers Professor Márta Korbonits (Barts Health NHS Trust) and Professor Susan Short (School of Medicine, University of Leeds) on topics including ‘Pituitary Genetics for Neurosurgeons’ and ‘Can we cure glioma with cannabinoids?’, as well as research scientists from the Brain Tumour Research Centre of Excellence, where Professor Oliver Hanemann is the Centre lead.

The symposium, hosted at the John Bull building at the University of Plymouth, provided the opportunity for clinicians to keep up to date with current research on low-grade brain tumours, including meningioma and schwannomas (including acoustic neuroma), as well as facilitating stimulating discussions between researchers and clinicians to further foster professional relationships supporting the translational pipeline for brain tumour research. 

Our Head of Stakeholder Relations, Hugh Adams said: “We are tremendously proud of our Plymouth Centre and the research we fund there. Research into low-grade brain tumours has been the underfunded of the underfunded but as this event has demonstrated there is positive progress in this vital area and that is good news for patients and their families. My congratulations to Prof Hanemann for a thought-provoking, informative and engaging symposium.”

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