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National brain tumour research funding needs to increase to £30-35 million a year

My pituitary gland tumour changed my life for the better

Kelly Lee was just 29 when she was diagnosed with a tumour on her pituitary gland. She is sharing her story of hope to mark Pituitary Awareness Month.

Kelly’s tumour was successfully removed during surgery but she estimates it took a full three years for her to recover completely.

Over the years, Kelly who lives in Waterlooville and runs dog grooming business Woofy Tails, has come to accept her diagnosis and the trauma of the subsequent surgery and even says her life has improved as a result.

She said: “Being diagnosed with a brain tumour has changed my life for the better. It has strengthened my marriage, increased my confidence and motivated me to start my own business. I love my life and count myself as very fortunate.”

Kelly will remain on medication for life and, every morning, wakes with what feels like a severe hangover – fortunately the tablets she takes sort this out. Another consequence of the removal of her pituitary gland means that Kelly will never have children but counts herself fortunate that, although for some people this would be very hard, having a family was never something she planned to do.

Kelly is photographed with springer spaniel Murphy. We wish them both all the very best!

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