IN HOPE... brave soldiers who have battled through


The diagnosis of a brain tumour is devastating, however there is hope.  We have been fortunate to meet some very brave people who have survived to tell the tale and who want to share their story to give hope to others.


Alan Williams

 

My husband Alan was diagnosed in 2007 with a brain tumour, following a seizure.  It was just five years after his younger brother, James, passed away from the same devastating disease.  Alan, 46, has been told that the tumour has now become very aggressive and, following recent further surgery at The Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, he is currently undergoing chemotherapy, under the care of The Cancer Centre in Belfast City Hospital. Read Alan's Story...



Alexandra Dixon


Alexandra Dixon was diagnosed with a low-grade oligodendroglioma brain tumour after suffering a series of severe epileptic seizures while on holiday in the south of France. Back in the UK, she underwent surgery in June 2007. An MRI scan in 2012 revealed the tumour had returned. She had surgery again followed by radio and chemotherapy. Alexandra tells her story:
 



Anna Swabey
 

Diagnosed with a brain tumour at the age of 23, Anna Swabey was intitally given just months to live. Now under the care of neurosurgeon Kevin O’Neill, who leads the Brain Tumour Research Centre of Excellence at Imperial College, London, Anna has had surgery and treatment, become engaged and is looking forward to her wedding. She is sharing her experiences through her blog Inside My Head and fundraising for research into brain tumours.
 

“I am fortunate in that I don’t feel my illness dictates my life and while I am most definitely the same person, I even feel as if I am a better person for it. I know this may sound odd but my diagnosis has made me view my life differently and the way I am choosing to live now leaves me feeling fulfilled. I love knowing that I can make a difference, and, potentially help others.” Anna tells her story…

 



Andrew Crowe

 

Andrew Crowe is in his early 40s and lives  in Swindon.  He has a brain
tumour and has been through numerous operations and is trying hard
to regain his normal life. Read Andrew's story...



Andrew Scarborough


Andrew was just 27 when he was diagnosed with a high grade anaplastic astrocytoma brain tumour. He underwent surgery and began chemotherapy. After four months he stopped the treatment and made significant changes to his diet. Two years after surgery, a scan has shown no tumour growth, he has been able to come off all medication and is hoping to go back to work to investigate how nutritional therapy, including a restricted ketogenic diet, could help other patients. Andrew tells his story…
 



Andrew Stammers

 

Andrew, 39, is a practising ordained Baptist Minister at Radstock Baptist Church in Somerset.  He lives with his wife Suzanne and three daughters, Gracie, Tamzin and Amwyn. Read Andrew's Story...



April Watkins

 

April was diagnosed with a grade IV medulloblastoma in 2010 during her first year at university after suffering with debilitating headaches.  Her mother had recently been diagnosed with lung cancer and tragically passed away while April was receiving treatment following her brain surgery.  She has since been given the all clear. Read April's Story...



Ben Anderson
 

Fourteen-year-old Young Scout Leader Ben Anderson went to the optician for a check up at the end of the summer holidays. Within hours he was referred to hospital and a scan revealed he had a brain tumour. Immedicate action was required and Ben underwent surgery. He recovered well but needed further treatment, this time in the US, to halt the growth of his tumour. Despite the gruelling treatment and distruption cause to his schooling, Ben did well in his GCSEs and is now studying for a career which he hopes will see him working with children with special needs.
 

“My world had been turned upside town. I had walked into the opticians with a child who seemed perfectly healthy and was just days away from going into year 10 to start his GCSE courses. Less than 24 hours later my son was diagnosed with a brain tumour and needed life-saving surgery. I was 29 weeks pregnant. When Ben turned to me and said: ‘I really want to be here to meet my new baby brother or sister. Am I going to die mum?’ I told him no, he wasn’t going to die and we would do whatever was needed.” Ben’s mum Jane tells his story…

 



Ben Lindon

 

Ben Lindon was diagnosed with an inoperable grade II glioblastoma multiforme brain tumour on March 11, 2008, a week before his 29th birthday. He underwent radiotherapy treatment and continues to receive chemotherapy, having endured 54 cycles of Temozolamide to date. Amazingly, having been told that all his treatment would render him infertile, in September 2012, Ben fathered a miracle baby girl, Martha Rose. Even more amazingly, his wife, Kate, is expecting another miracle - a baby son in June 2014, despite Ben having endured 60 cycles of chemotherapy. Read Ben’s story




Cat Anderson


In August 2014, a CT scan revealed that Cat, aged 36, had a brain tumour. A follow-up MRI scan led medics to think it was benign and that it could be completely removed, however, following surgery and a biopsy the devastating news came back that the tumour was in fact cancerous, although slow-growing. Cat’s family and friends all rallied round to help and to fundraise, resulting in the setting up of a fundraising group called Cat in a Hat. Here is Cat’s story as told by her father, Rab…
 



Charlie Boutwood

 

Charlie was the much wanted son of his parents.  They already had
two daughters and he completed their happy family.  At 20 months he
faced the terrifying prospect of surgery to remove an enormous and
malignant brain tumour.   Miraculously he made a remarkable
recovery. Read Charlie's story...



Charlie Cox
 

Charlie was just eight months old in 2012 when he first started to have any symptoms. Then he was diagnosed with a brain tumour (which turned out to be a grade 2 oligoastrocytoma – rare among young children) and at 11 months he underwent surgery. Just over three years later, in January 2015, Charlie welcomed his little brother Freddie into the world and in September the same year, he started in Reception at Abbey Primary School in Morden, Surrey. Against this background, however, Charlie is still having chemotherapy…
 

“Most of the time I have managed to stay positive – I have had to be strong for Charlie. The only time I really broke down throughout this roller-coaster was the day before my baby boy had his huge operation. I couldn’t help worrying that I might end up leaving the hospital without Charlie.” Here is Charlie’s story as told by his mother, Kirsty…
 



Charlie Pudney

Charlie was just seven-years-old when he was diagnosed with an ependymoma. The tumour was successfully removed in surgery but, as there was a high chance of regrowth, Charlie and his family travelled to the States for nine weeks of Proton Beam Therapy. Now back at school and enjoying football once more, Charlie is well and undergoes regular scans. The experience has changed the life of his family forever.


“Charlie is the same little boy as he was before although, emotionally, the experience has changed us. We live for now and don’t take anything for granted. I am angry and frustrated to think that brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer … yet just 1% of the national spend on cancer research has been allocated to this devastating disease. This is such a complex disease and although I understand this makes diagnosis and treatment so difficult, it affects so many young people that this is precisely why more needs to be done.” Charlie’s mum Vicky tells his story...

 



Christopher Todd


Husband, father, and grandfather, Christopher Todd was 63 when he was diagnosed with an aggressive grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme brain tumour after suffering violent headaches and stroke-like symptoms. As he underwent surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy his daughter Vicky set about raising funding for research to help get him better.


“When dad was diagnosed I just couldn’t understand how this could happen. How can so many people have brain tumours yet so little be known? I was flabbergasted to learn that brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer yet receive so little funding. How can it be right that just 1% of the national spend on cancer research is allocated to this devastating disease? I cannot sit by and let this happen so I set about fundraising for Brain Tumour Research to help my dad get better.” Christopher’s daughter Vicky tells his story…

 



Claire Button

 

Claire was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2008 after she was taken ill Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, and immediately evacuated back to the UK. Claire lives with her husband Phil and their daughter Ellen. Read Claire's story...



Claire Whittle

 

Claire, a French teacher at Stanton School in Milton Keynes, was diagnosed with a grade 2/3 astrocytoma in 2011, aged 51.  She made a decision at the time that she wouldn’t be a victim and that she would live to be a grandmother. Nearly five years on she feels so blessed to still be here.

 

“I was given the news by a hard-nosed clinical nurse specialist because my neurosurgeon was called away on an emergency.  She walked in with a big white envelope and bluntly stated: “There is no cure… but the good news is that you can have a bus pass.” Read Claire's story...

 


Darcyana Aspery-Walsh

 

Darcy was 21 months old when she was finally diagnosed with a brain tumour, but her mother had to fight to get medics to listen.  Despite months of morning vomiting, right-sided weakness and balance issues, her parents felt they were fobbed off with unconvincing diagnoses and made to feel like they were being over-protective.
 

“My mission now is to raise awareness of brain tumours and their symptoms.  Mothers know by instinct when their children are seriously ill and we can’t always just accept that the medical profession will come up with the right diagnosis first time, or even the tenth time.  Sometimes you just have to keep knocking on the door until someone finally listens.  Thank God someone did listen… just in time." Read Darcyana’s story…



Dave Holden


Father-of-three Dave Holden is living with a grade 3 astrocytoma brain tumour. It was diagnosed in 2010 after he began to experience difficulty driving. The tumour responded well to 18 months of chemotherapy and radiation but a scan in March 2015 revealed it had returned. Dave continues to work full-time and remains positive about the future.


“I can’t be bothered with the doom and gloom. I do have days where I can feel down, but my wife gives me a kick to help me get over it. We have the kids to think about and I need to be here and on good form for as long as I can in order to look after my family.” Dave tells his story…
 



David Grant

 

David Grant was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme grade IV brain tumour in August 2005. He was working as a Senior Project Manager for the Royal Bank of Scotland and married with a two-year-old daughter at the time. David was told he could have just 12 months to live. Fast forward to today: David hasn’t received cancer medication since 2006 and is now watching his daughter growing up. Read David's story…



David Rickford

 

"David was 28 when he was diagnosed with a brain tumour, having already recovered from Hodgkins Lymphoma. As his mother, I have really felt the utter helplessness of the situation and now want to do something to help others if I can." Read David's Story...



Emily Corrigan
 

Emily Corrigan put her headaches down to her hectic life as the mother of four young children. She got on with raising her family and put up with the pain and fatigue for two years before being diagnosed with a low-grade glioma which was successfully removed during surgery. Emily recovered in time to see her second child start school but suffered from depression as she came to terms with what had happened. In February 2015, she posted a photograph on Facebook showing the scar across her head and her appeal for people to sign an e-petition calling for more government investment into researching brain tumours was shared more than 18,000 times.
 

“It breaks my heart to think of mum holding me that night when I nearly died. No parent should ever have to bury their child and I worry about the unthinkable happening to any of my kids. Brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer yet just 1% of the national spend on cancer research has been allocated to this area. It was a big decision for me to post a photograph on Facebook showing the scar from my surgery. I did it to provoke a reaction and am proud to think it contributed to prompting a House of Commons debate on the under-funding of research into this devastating disease.” Emily tells her story...

 



Emily Jones

 

Emily, a PhD student at Oxford University, was studying for a master’s degree at Exeter College in 2011 when she started to feel unwell.  It was a year later when she was finally diagnosed with a malignant ependymoma brain tumour, having taken matters into her own hands and financed a private consultation that she could ill afford. Her journey of diagnosis and treatment, which has included extensive radiotherapy, has demonstrated some disparities in approaches to treatments in the UK for her condition. Read Emily’s story…



Fiona Reid

Fitness fanatic Fiona discovered she had a brain tumour after collapsing at the gym. In the last six years she has undergone surgery and treatment as her tumour, classified as “low-grade” has continued to grow and cause paralysis. With the support of her husband, mother and friends, Fiona remains optimistic and will be supporting Wear A Hat Day 2016.

 

“I have known from the beginning that my tumour can’t be cured but I remain relatively optimistic. New treatments are coming out and I hope that there might be trials which I could be put forward for. My husband Andy is a very positive person. He has been a tower of strength and has kept me going. I see my mum every day and have great support from my friends.” Fiona tells her story …



Francoise Shelton

 

Francoise was 47 when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour.  She and her family had noticed some big personality changes prior to her falling unconsious.  Francoise owes her recovery to the care and support she received from her children who were 20, 18 and 15 years old at the time. Read Francoise's story...



Gary Robinson


Father-of-two Gary Robinson marked his 34th birthday in May 2015 by running the Manchester 10K to raise money for Brain Tumour Research. It was the first such event he had taken part in and it came just months after he underwent surgery and radiotherapy to remove an extremely rare and aggressive grade II haemangiopericytoma brain tumour. Gary tells his story…
 



Gemma Edgar


Gemma, 29, a paediatric nurse at Colchester General Hospital, and a wife and mother, was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour after just a few days of migraine-type symptoms. Her sons, Noah and Dylan were just eight weeks and two years old at the time. Gemma tells her story…
 



Gemma Gliddon


Mother-of-two Gemma Gliddon is awaiting surgery for a schwannoma brain tumour which has regrown after a previous operation. Determined to remain positive, Gemma, 32, is training to become a nurse and is helping to raise awareness and funds for research by taking part Wear A Hat Day 2015 just four days after her latest operation. She tells her story…
 



George Stocker

 

In April 2008 George became ill and was diagnosed with a brain tumour. George underwent over 80 weeks of treatment including multiple operations, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. George and his family started fundraising in August 2008 and have raised over £32,000. Read George's story...


 



Gruff Crowther


Schoolboy Gruff Crowther was diagnosed with a brain tumour after minor but repeated difficulties with his eyesight. At the age of seven, he was the youngest patient to attend a reception at Speaker’s House, Westminster, in March 2016 when he joined the charity Brain Tumour Research in calling for more funding for the devastating disease.


“We have been very open with Gruff right from the start, telling him right from day one that he has a tumour and that means a lump of badly behaved cells which are reproducing incorrectly. He is aware that there are different types of brain tumour and different types of cancer. While Gruff’s tumour is low-grade we mustn’t been fooled into thinking that means it is benign – we are aware that the rate of growth can accelerate and things can become problematic. Left untreated, Gruff’s tumour would definitely have caused more problems as it spread. So far, his scans have shown the tumour has reduced in size and, for now, things are looking positive.” Gruff’s father Richard tells his story...
 



Heather Turner

 

Heather was 24 when she was diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma, a low-grade brain tumour which caused partial hearing loss. The only treatment option was surgery but complications caused nerve damage leading to life-long difficulties including facial palsy and the loss of sight in one eye.
 

“It took me ten years to recover from the damage caused by surgery to remove my brain tumour. There have been times when I’ve wondered if life was still worth living. Although I have lost count of the number of operations I have had to make me look ‘normal’, I now feel as if the worst thing that ever happened to me has changed my life for the better.” Read Heather's story...

 


Helen Legh


New mum, Helen Legh, a BBC radio presenter, feared her baby daughter Matilda wouldn’t survive. Now five, Matilda is thriving, but Helen faces the grim reality that she won’t see her daughter grow up and is making the most of whatever time they have left together. She is also creating a treasure chest of precious mementoes for Matilda to cherish when she is gone.
 


“Even my worst fears hadn’t prepared me for this. I immediately thought of my Matilda, then just four years old, who had only recently started at school. How long was she going to have a Mummy? I was so sad to think how I was never going to see her grow up, or get married, how I was never going to be a Granny. And more to the point, how were she and her Daddy going to cope when I died?” Read Helen's story...
 



Holly Timbrell

 

Holly had a headache which wouldn't go away.  An MRI scan revealed a brain tumour in a very inaccessible place.  Now she is a teenager trying to live a normal life in between 3 monthly scans. Read Holly's story...



Ian Wrigglesworth

 

Ian lives with his wife, Debi-Ann, and their beloved dogs.  He believes in healthy living and follows a strict nutritional plan.  Before he was diagnosed with a grade III oligodenroglioma, he had never had any serious illness or been admitted into hospital. Read Ian's story...



Jack Brydon

 

In 2003 and aged 17 Jack Brydon discovered he had a brain tumour. Today he is fit and well and leading a normal life.  He counts himself as one of the few lucky ones. Read Jack's story...



Jack Byam Shaw

 

In May 1999, Sheila Hancock's grandson Jack was diagnosed with a brain tumour at just four years old. His mother, Melanie, was shocked at how long it took to diagnose him and at the nail-biting wait to determine the type of tumour and the treatment necessary. Reeling from the shock of diagnosis, they were delighted after several weeks of waiting to discover that they were one of the lucky ones - Jack's tumour was low grade - and following five years of scans he is now scan free and living a normal healthy life. Read Jack's story...



James Crossley

 

Life was turned upside down in August 2000 when James, aged nine, was diagnosed with a brain tumour and underwent two huge operations.  After the last operation he was left with weakness down his right side, severe speech problems, as well as educational and visual difficulties. Today, James’ story is one of hope as he overcomes his disabilities and looks to a more independent future. Read James’ Story…



James Hinnigan
 

New dad James Hinnigan was enjoying life with his partner and their son in Australia when he was diagnosed with a low-grade glioma brain tumour. The family moved back to Greater Manchester just before Christmas 2015 to be near friends and family as they faced the uncertain journey ahead. James mobilised thousands of people across the region to sign an e-petition calling for more funding for research into the disease which is the biggest cancer killer of the under 40s. He has been accepted for a clinical trial and is waiting for a date for surgery and looking forward to the birth of his second child in May.
 

“I do have bad days of course where I feel down and panic about what might happen but, on the whole, I am positive and always try to remember that there is someone, somewhere, who is worse off than me. This is the hand I have been dealt and I have to get on and play the game.” James tells his story…

 



Jay Wheeler

 

Although Jay's brain tumour was completely removed during surgery, he then had to undergo radiotherapy and chemo, leaving him with a , number of different side effects.  Despite his agonising ordeal he is looking forward to starting his degree course in Animation and Special Effects. Read Jay's story...



Jess Taylor

 

Jess was just 13 years old when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour. Almost seven years on, she has endured two craniotomies and numerous rounds of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Despite her poor prognosis all those years ago, with the help of her neurosurgeons and doctors, Jess is now 19 years old and studying at college to become a beautician. Read Jess's story...



John Stuart

 

John had an operation to remove his brain tumour in 2004 and ever since, his scans have revealed no evident tumour.  He feels very lucky, not only to have survived, but to have been able to rebuild his life and return to work, albeit not in the same capacity as before. Read John's story...



Josie Phillips
 

It took doctors five years to diagnose Josie with a grade 2 astrocytoma brain tumour. Four years later and a year after graduating from Medical School, Josie faced the devastating news that the tumour had become malignant. After two craniotomies, chemo and radiotherapy, and a round-the-UK sailing challenge to raise awareness, Josie, has had clear scans for the last five years. Now the mother of two young girls, Josie is determined to live life to the full for as long as she can.
 

“I am very conscious of how little is known about brain tumours and how there needs to be a huge amount more research into what causes them, how to prevent them and, of course, how to treat them.” Read Josie’s story…
 



Julie Basleigh

 

Julie lives in Redhouse, Swindon, Wiltshire and is 38.  Her father, Richard Flippence, was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme brain tumour (GBM4), but it was already too late for him to have treatment and he died four months later, aged 63.  Just nine years later, Julie herself was diagnosed with a benign brain tumour.  Only too aware of what had happened to her dad, she resolved not to watch and wait for her tumour to become malignant, but to have surgery to remove it as quickly as possible.  Tragically, even before she had surgery, Julie discovered that the tumour had upgraded to a GBM4, just like her father.

 

“Although I was told I would be fine, I knew that even a low grade tumour meant a lower life expectancy.  I already had more knowledge than most people about brain tumours – I had lost my Dad to a GBM4 in 2005 when he was 63 and I was only 28.” Read Julie's story...



Kerri Parker

 

Kerri Parker, from Dereham, Norwich runs The Kerri Parker Model Academy helping thousands of aspiring models start out or further their modelling careers. Kerri herself is an award-winning model and has competed in pageants around the world. She was diagnosed with two different types of brain tumour during the winter of 2013 just before her 30th birthday. Read Kerri's story...



Kian Jones


The life of schoolboy Kian Jones was saved by his mother’s determination to pursue an accurate diagnosis of her son’s headaches and sickness. Trainee nurse Sabina’s relentless demands for a brain scan proved her instincts were correct. Kian’s condition was life threatening and he underwent emergency surgery. He is now settling back into “normal” life. Here, Kian’s mum Sabina tells his story…
 



Leah Martin

 

Leah was diagnosed with a high-grade medullablastoma brain tumour at the age of two. She has undergone several operations and a gruelling regime of high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Now at pre-school, Leah has long-term side effects including problems with her speech and mobility.

 

 

Our little girl was so diminished by the treatment that I pleaded with her consultant not to go ahead with the last two sessions. I felt I could no longer put her through the daily ordeal of a general anaesthetic, of being taken from my arms and laid down on what seemed to me to be a cold slab, and pinned down by a face mask. In the end, I felt we had to trust the doctors and Leah did complete the course of 31 sessions over six weeks. For Leah it was normality and she probably assumed everyone did it; it was worse for us.” Leah's mother Joanne tells her story...



Leon Murphy


Leon was just a normal 24-year-old, studying music technology at Bolton University and enjoying life playing bass guitar in a band, when he was diagnosed with a grade IV astroglioma brain tumour in 2011. He attributed his headaches to stress and late nights. Little did he know that it was the beginning of a rollercoaster ride of emotional turmoil. Here, he tells his story of living with a brain tumour at such a young age and, how nearly four years on, his positivity is helping him face an uncertain future. Leon tells his story...



Lily Hawkins


Lily’s Mum, Lorraine is a trained and experienced midwife, but nothing could prepare her for the day when her six-year-old daughter was diagnosed with a brain tumour, many months after she first started displaying worrying signs which were repeatedly dismissed by doctors. Now Lorraine is determined to raise awareness particularly of the symptoms of brain tumours to ensure that patients are given the earliest possible diagnosis. Read Lily's story...



Lisa Brassington 


Since being diagnosed with a brain tumour in February 2011, Lisa has decided to live life to the full. She has been skiing, is learning to sail, is taking acting classes and has even been on TV as an extra in Emmerdale. The location of her low-grade oligodendroglioma brain tumour meant it could not be fully removed by surgery. The tumour is now growing and she lives with the anxiety of three-monthly scans. Lisa tells her story…
 



Lisa Meenan
 

Lisa was just 21 when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour. The shock news came as she and her family were coming to terms with the loss of a seven-year-old cousin to the same disease. Lisa underwent surgery and treatment, went on to graduate with a degree in architecture and took up Bollywood dancing a few years ago.
 

“In a way, being diagnosed with a brain tumour has been the worst thing and the best thing that has ever happened to me. I have had such a happy ending to my brain tumour story but nobody knows what is around the corner or down the road. I have learned that you can’t assume you will live until you are in your 80s or 90s and facing your mortality at such a young age is life-changing. It has taken time to come to terms with these experiences; I am now able to accept this as part of my life’s journey.” Lisa tells her story …

 



Luke Dustan 


Luke had been suffering from headaches and seeing flashing lights. He discovered he had a brain tumour when a university colleague conducted an MRI scan. Currently undergoing chemotherapy, Luke, aged 29, is about to complete his PhD in neuropsychology. He has a twin brother Alex, and a sister Hayley. He lives in South Molton, with is partner Julia. Also supporting him is his mum Angie, who lives in Plymouth. Luke’s mum Angie tells his story…
 



Lyra Cole 


Little Lyra Cole was just five months old when she underwent emergency surgery to remove a brain tumour. Initially misdiagnosed as a virus, Lyra’s symptoms had included loss of appetite and vomiting. The surgery was successful but, within months, she was struggling to see. Happily a second procedure restored her sight. Here, Lyra’s dad Dan tells her story…
 



Maisie Dury

 

Maisie was two and a half when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour – her parents were initially told it was epilepsy.  Fortunately a neurologist suggested a routine MRI scan which revealed that she had a low grade brain tumour and because it had been caught in time it could be successfully removed. Read Maisie's story...

 



Marian Dye

 

Marian Dye first started to get symptoms in 1988. For nine years she visited doctors who put her headaches down to a variety of reasons. Finally, in 1997 she was diagnosed and in 1999 she had an operation to remove a brain tumour. Since then she has lived life to the full caring for her deaf and blind husband, going to work, in addition she is also a school governor and spends a lot of time with her granddaughter. Read Marian's story...



Meg Hill

 

Meg was aged 19 and about to begin a new life at university when she was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour.  She was operated on in Boston, USA, having been deemed inoperable in the UK and is now married and living life to the full. Read Meg's story...



Melanie Hennessy

 

Having suffered with headaches for many years, Mel discovered she had two meningioma tumours just a few weeks after she gave birth to her daughter, Daisy Boo.  She has lost the sight in her left eye, but is just thankful to be alive.  She wants to do anything she can to raise awareness and funds for research into brain tumours. Read Melanie's story...



Melissa Huggins

 

Melissa is an attractive twenty-eight year old primary school teacher with a Grade III Anaplastic Ependymoma brain tumour and further tumours in her spine.  She was diagnosed in 2005 after many years of not knowing what was wrong.  In 2009 with the help of her sister, fiance and friends she raised £250,000 to send her to Boston, US for proton therapy to shrink the tumour.  She has since had chemotherapy and radiotherapy and is back teaching at school three days a week. Read Melissa's story...



Nicci Roscoe

 

Nicci Roscoe is a professional inspirational speaker and corporate and lifestyle coach. NIcci's book, Fabulous Impact, is a guide to taking charge of your life and underpins her work to boost confidence and impact. In 2001, Nicci, a mother of two teenage children, was given the devastating news that she had a brain tumour. Read Nicci's story...



Nicole Witts

 

Nicole is a bubbly mother of two gorgeous girls.  In 2008 her life changed dramatically - she found she had a tumour the size of an orange in her head.  Although the tumour was benign it took nine hours of surgery to remove it at the risk of her speech.  Despite the success of the operation she now has epilepsy, cannot drive, cook or bath her children.  Amazingly after all that, Nicole has come out fighting - she has a passionate desire to educate doctors about how to diagnose and then treat people with brain tumours. Read Nicole's story...



Oli Hilsdon

Oli grew up in Buckingham, attending Bourton Meadow Primary and the Royal Latin Grammar School. He was a keen member of Buckingham Rugby Club and enjoyed running to keep fit. Oli left the Latin with A’ levels in Maths, Further Maths and Economics and then went on to Cambridge University to study Economics, where he was also able to continue playing rugby. He now works for Blackstone, an American Private Equity company in London. Here is Oli’s story…
 



Paul Bartlett

 

Paul discovered he had "Terry the Tumour" when he was knocked off his bike and suffered concussion.  He had had no symptoms at all. Read Paul's story...



Paul Taylor


Former journalist Paul Taylor, 56, of Thanet, Kent, was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour in September 2012. He underwent surgery to debulk the tumour and now, every three months he anxiously awaits the results of a scan to tell him if the tumour has returned. Here is Paul’s story…
 



Paul Van-Zandvliet

 

A well-known former member of the rugby world and a key player in the Newcastle Falcons Premiership-winning team of 1998, Paul, 49, is taking on the fight of his life. Having been diagnosed with three types of cancer, the North Shields father of five is now focusing on spending quality time with his family, fundraising and raising awareness.

 

“You can’t imagine how my family and I felt on discovering that I had three types of cancer, having gone to the hospital just to have my back pain assessed.” Paul tells his story...



Reuben Coe 


Reuben Coe, 17, first became ill during a school geography trip. Within days he was diagnosed with a brain tumour in Lancaster and he and his mother Karen waited for an emergency ambulance to transfer them to Manchester Children’s Hospital. After five months of treatment, Reuben is now back at school studying for his A levels. His mum Karen tells his story…
 



Richard Preston


Richard Preston was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumour which was discovered after he began suffering persistent headaches. He underwent surgery to remove a tumour the size of a large apricot which was located behind his left eye. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy followed. In March 2014, Richard, 45, married Wendy, his partner of 25 years. Richard tells his story...
 



Rob Mottram


Rob was just 24 when he was diagnosed with an inoperable astrocytoma glioma brain tumour. Faced with a bleak prognosis of just 18 months he underwent treatment, including radiotherapy, knowing it was likely to destroy his hopes of ever having children. Dubbed the “miracle man” for outliving expectations, he went on to father a “miracle baby.” With Rob’s condition deteriorating and treatment options running out, his wife Teresa and their daughter Lily-May, aged two-and-a-half, are now praying for a miracle of a different kind.

“As Rob finished his radiotherapy, I was working on a maternity ward in the same hospital. On the one hand I was celebrating new life and dreaming of the babies we longed for, while on the other I was facing the very real possibility of losing the man I loved and, with his death, the future we had planned.” Teresa tells Rob’s story…

 



Ryan Taylor


Ryan Taylor of Stathern Walk, Nottingham, lives with the uncertainty of an unidentified brain tumour. Ryan was first diagnosed in September 2013 and since then the 23-year-old has undergone surgery twice and relies on anti-epilepsy medication to control seizures. He tells his story…
 



Shannon Moore


Shannon was diagnosed with a rare craniopharyngioma when she was just nine-years-old. She underwent emergency surgery and has endured several operations over the years, plus treatment including radiotherapy and hormone replacement. Now 18, and a college student, she is certified blind and relies on a long cane to help her get about. She is looking forward to leaving home and studying at university. Shannon’s mum Paula White tells her story...
 



Sophie Duffee


For the parents of five-year-old Sophie Duffee their world began to unravel when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour. They discovered her in bed and feared the worst as she suffered a severe seizure. Fortunately the tumour was operable and Sophie has just returned to full-time school. She undergoes scans twice a year. Her mum Tracey tells her story…
 



Sophie Peters


Sophie was eventually diagnosed with a low-grade meningioma brain tumour after suffering crippling headaches for nearly a year. Feeling frustrated and desperate after months of repeated visits to her GP, it was a chance visit to an optician which led to her diagnosis. Eighteen months after her surgery Sophie is back at work but still struggles with nightmares about the tumour coming back. Sophie tells her story…
 



Stewart Tranter


Stewart Tranter is living with an inoperable grade III astrocytoma brain tumour. The tumour was diagnosed in 2013 and, supported by his wife Anna, he has coped with extensive treatment including 30 cycles of radiotherapy and 14 months of chemotherapy, including the drug Temozolomide. Thanks to an understanding employer, Stewart, 35, continues to work and he is backing the campaign for more research funding. Here is his story…



Vetri Velamail

 

Vetri worked in Rotherham as a GP for more than 20 years and is a proud father of three much loved children.  Suffering with double vision, an optician at Specsavers sent him to A&E and he was diagnosed with a Glioblastoma Multiforme. Read Vetri's story...



Wayne Chessum

 

Wayne was 39 and the father of three children, including a young daughter of five years old who had survived meningitis, when he was diagnosed with a haemangioblastoma (just 2% of brain tumours are this type) in 2008. Read Wayne’s story…





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