IN HOPE... brave soldiers, who have battled through


The diagnosis of a brain tumour is devastating, however there is hope.  We have been fortunate to meet some very brave people who have survived to tell the tale and who want to share their story to give hope to others.


Paul Bartlett

 

Paul discovered he had "Terry the Tumour" when he was knocked off his bike and suffered concussion.  He had had no symptoms at all. Read Paul's story...



Charlie Boutwood

 

Charlie was the much wanted son of his parents.  They already had
two daughters and he completed their happy family.  At 20 months he
faced the terrifying prospect of surgery to remove an enormous and
malignant brain tumour.   Miraculously he made a remarkable
recovery. Read Charlie's story...



Claire Button

 

Claire was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2008 after she was taken ill Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, and immediately evacuated back to the UK. Claire lives with her husband Phil and their daughter Ellen. Read Claire's story...



Jack Brydon

 

In 2003 and aged 17 Jack Brydon discovered he had a brain tumour. Today he is fit and well and leading a normal life.  He counts himself as one of the few lucky ones. Read Jack's story...



Jack Byam Shaw

 

In May 1999, Sheila Hancock's grandson Jack was diagnosed with a brain tumour at just four years old.  His mother, Melanie, was shocked at how long it took to diagnose him and at the nail-biting wait to determine the
type of tumour and the treatment necessary.  Reeling from the shock of diagnosis, they were delighted after several weeks of waiting to discover that they were one of the lucky ones - Jack's tumour was low grade - and following five years of scans he is now scan free and living a normal healthy life. Read Jack's story...



James Crossley

 

Life was turned upside down in August 2000 when James, aged 9, was diagnosed with a brain tumour and went through 2 huge operations. He has been left with severe speech difficulties, weakness down his right side, educational and visual difficulties. Read James' story...



Andrew Crowe

 

Andrew Crowe is in his early 40s and lives  in Swindon.  He has a brain
tumour and has been through numerous operations and is trying hard
to regain his normal life. Read Andrew's story...



Alexandra Drummond

 

In 2007 after a sudden unprecedented series of fits Alexandra (then 33) was diagnosed with a brain tumour.  While it was suspected to be benign, surgeons were keen to operate as soon as possible using a new type of equipment called the SonoWand which would help to remove as much of the tumour as possible.

Three years on she is healthy, happy and heavily involved in fundraising and campaigning for the work of the charity Brain Tumour Research Campaign (BTRC).  Despite needing to take anti-seizure medicine for the rest of her life she is surprisingly upbeat and keen to use her experience to help others who have been affected by brain tumours. Read Alexandra's story...



Maisie Dury

 

Maisie was two and a half when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour her parents were initially told it was epilepsy.  Fortunately a neurologist suggested a routine MRI scan which revealed that she had a low grade brain tumour and because it had been caught in time it could be successfully removed. Read Maisie's story...



Marian Dye

 

Marian Dye first started to get symptoms in 1988.  For nine years she visited doctors who put her headaches down to a variety of reasons. Finally, in 1997 she was diagnosed and in 1999 she had an operation
to remove a brain tumour.  Since then she has lived life to the full caring for her deaf and blind husband, going to work, in addition she is also a school governor and spends a lot of time with her granddaughter. Read Marian's story...



David Grant

 

David Grant was diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme grade IV brain tumour in August 2005. He was working as a Senior Project Manager for the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) and married with a two-year-old daughter at the time. David was told he could have just 12 months to live. Fast forward to today: David hasn’t received cancer medication since 2006 and is now watching his daughter growing up. Read David's story…



Melanie Hennessy

 

Having suffered with headaches for many years, Mel discovered she had two meningioma tumours just a few weeks after she gave birth to her daughter, Daisy Boo.  She has lost the sight in her left eye, but is just thankful to be alive.  She wants to do anything she can to raise awareness and funds for research into brain tumours. Read Melanie's story...



Meg Hill

 

Meg was aged 19 and about to begin a new life at university when she was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour.  She was operated on in Boston, USA, having been deemed inoperable in the UK and is now married and living life to the full. Read Meg's story...



Melissa Huggins

 

Melissa is an attractive twenty-eight year old primary school teacher with a Grade III Anaplastic Ependymoma brain tumour and further tumours in her spine.  She was diagnosed in 2005 after many years of not knowing what was wrong.  In 2009 with the help of her sister, fiance and friends she raised £250,000 to send her to Boston, US for proton therapy to shrink the tumour.  She has since had chemotherapy and radiotherapy and is back teaching at school three days a week. Read Melissa's story...



Emily Jones

 

Emily, a PhD student at Oxford University, was studying for a master’s degree at Exeter College in 2011 when she started to feel unwell.  It was a year later when she was finally diagnosed with a malignant ependymoma brain tumour, having taken matters into her own hands and financed a private consultation that she could ill afford. Her journey of diagnosis and treatment, which has included extensive radiotherapy, has demonstrated some disparities in approaches to treatments in the UK for her condition. Read Emily’s story…



Ben Lindon

 

Ben Lindon was diagnosed with an inoperable grade II glioblastoma multiforme brain tumour on March 11, 2008, a week before his 29th birthday.  He underwent radiotherapy treatment and continues to receive chemotherapy, having endured 54 cycles of Temozolamide to date.  Amazingly, having been told that all his treatment would render him infertile, in September 2012, Ben fathered a miracle baby girl, Martha Rose. Even more amazingly, his wife, Kate, is expecting another miracle - a baby son in June 2014, despite Ben having endured 60 cycles of chemotherapy. Read Ben’s story…



Francoise Shelton

 

Francoise was 47 when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour.  She and her family had noticed some big personality changes prior to her falling unconsious.  Francoise owes her recovery to the care and support she received from her children who were 20, 18 and 15 years old at the time. Read Francoise's story...



George Stocker

 

In April 2008 George became ill and was diagnosed with a brain tumour.  George underwent over 80 weeks of treatment including multiple operations, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Read George's story...

George and his family started fundraising in August 2008 and have raised over
£32,000.



John Stuart

 

John had an operation to remove his brain tumour in 2004 and ever since, his scans have revealed no evident tumour.  He feels very lucky, not only to have survived, but to have been able to rebuild his life and return to work, albeit not in the same capacity as before. Read John's story...



Holly Timbrell

 

Holly had a headache which wouldn't go away.  An MRI scan revealed a brain tumour in a very inaccessible place.  Now she is a teenager trying to live a normal life in between 3 monthly scans. Read Holly's story...



Vetri Velamail

 

Vetri worked in Rotherham as a GP for more than 20 years and is a proud father of three much loved children.  Suffering with double vision, an optician at Specsavers sent him to A&E and he was diagnosed with a Glioblastoma Multiforme. Read Vetri's story...



Jay Wheeler

 

Although Jay's brain tumour was completely removed during surgery, he then had to undergo radiotherapy and chemo, leaving him with a , number of different side effects.  Despite his agonising ordeal he is looking forward to starting his degree course in Animation and Special Effects. Read Jay's story...



Dan Wiggins

 

Dan was first diagnosed with a grade II brain tumour after a grand mal seizure in April 2006 when he was 30.  Since then he has received a variety of treatments including a craniotomy last year to de-bulk the tumour.  At that time he found out that the tumour had been re-classifed as a grade III or IV and his doctors recommended he should start receiving regular chemotherapy and radiotherapy at Charing Cross Hospital.  Dan is married to Lucy and has been involved with our Member Charity, Brain Tumour Research Campaign - The Way Ahead. Read Dan's story...



Ian Wrigglesworth

 

Ian lives with his wife, Debi-Ann, and their beloved dogs.  He believes in healthy living and follows a strict nutritional plan.  Before he was diagnosed with a grade III oligodenroglioma, he had never had any serious illness or been admitted into hospital. Read Ian's story...



Nicole Witts

 

Nicole is a bubbly mother of two gorgeous girls.  In 2008 her life changed dramatically - she found she had a tumour the size of an orange in her heard.  Although the tumour was benign it took nine hours of surgery to remove it at the risk of her speech.  Despite the success of the operation she now has epilepsy, cannot drive, cook or bath her children.  Amazingly after all that, Nicole has come out fighting - she has a passionate desire to educate doctors about how to diagnose and then treat people with brain tumours. Read Nicole's story...





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